Park hosts Sally Buffalo Days – Harrison News Herald

By ESTHER MCCOY

The Harrison County Regional Chamber of Commerce was showing off one of its once well traveled spots along State Route 250, The Heavilin Tea Room/Bed and Breakfast, that was captured in a prize-winning picture for the cover of the new Harrison information and tourism book published each year. It was available from the chamber at the front door of Wallace Lodge in Sally Buffalo Park for its annual festival days with a business expo, aisles of crafters, bakers and gardeners; entertainment; travelers information; Chinese auctions; update on the building of the Harrison Central All Grades School; food stands; Puskarich Public Library; Harrison Central High School; and various clubs. Joyce Brown, left, was the winner of the photo contest for the front cover of the booklet. She resided in the household and grew up helping with the many tea parties for club members ,overnight rooms and a meal for out of town travelers and the miniature animal spring events conducted by her parents, Harry and Helen Heavilin. Janeen Scott, right, is executive director of the Harrison County Regional Chamber of Commerce.

The Clark Gable Foundation held a Chinese Auction and many baskets of various themes were present for buyers to drop their purchased tickets into containers in the hopes of winning something. Pictured are Joyce Klinger, board member and volunteer at the museum, left; and Mary Jane Wood, Foundation member. The Gable Gift Shop and Museum is located on Charleston Street and open through October on Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 1:30 to 4 p.m.

One of the big attractions of Sally Buffalo Days is the early pancake, sausage, orange juice and hot drink meal provided by the Cadiz Lions Club in the kitchen area of Walace Lodge. It takes many members to clean the tables, keep them stocked with syrup, make sure there are enough plastic cutlery and dishes out for the cooks and especially fry the pancakes and prepare the sausage patties. It takes two to make the pancakes ahead but John Tabacchi has been at the sausage griddle almost since the club started holding the breakfasts in 1960. He is a 71 year of the Lions Club, the longest attending member and just celebrated his 100th birthday on Sept. 7. Staying active seems to keep John on the go and keeping up with adults many years younger.

CADIZ – With excellent pre-autumn weather on its side, the Harrison County Regional Chamber of Commerce and its many contributors put on a Sally Buffalo Days that had the outdoor exhibitors, food stands and sellers quite happy.

  The grounds took on a carnival look with the many eating establishments; the  selling of pumpkins, baked goods, tickets for a raffle on a four-wheel vehicle for the Luke Sedgmer Foundation and other events and materials.

  Janeen Scott, chamber executive director, was excited about the new cover on the county tourism book that was being distributed. It bore the picture of a farm that saw great activity through the late 1970’s to the time of a demise because of the declining health of Harry and Helen Heavilin. Organizations came  from many counties to the farm living room and dining room to have a sumptuous dinner or an afternoon tea for ladies church and club members. There were the Bed and Breakfast stays for those from out of town and each spring, there was a miniature farm animal event that brought families to the farm to show their children the animals.

  Joyce Brown, a daughter of the Heavilins, won the opportunity to have her photo of the farm house and its surrounding area on the front of the tourism book. “Each year there is a photo selected and Joyce was the winner this year,” Scott said. Harrison County was also featured at a booth in the Wallace Lodge, where George Bedway took his turn manning the table. The winery industry in Harrison County was highlighted by including the winery at Monzula Drive in Cadiz. Harrison County was highlighted in the magazine “Sip-Wine Weekends” listing the Blacksheep Vineyard on State Route 250, Adena; and the Vineyard 22 Winery at Monzula Drive in Cadiz.

  The  Harrison Hills City School District had a table with large plans of the school that will house all 13 grades and brochure to follow along. Puskarich Public Library had a table , with Ashley Smith, children’s librarian, and other staff members on hand to talk to the children.

Krista’s Collars had dog neck ware in Ohio State, Cleveland Browns, Pittsburgh Steelers, and other sports organizations. The Cozy Cabin had soaps for all types of skin types and  laundry soaps that used a certain berry that she was willing to show in the mix. Pops Barn on Gundry Ridge had many autumn arrangements and Ohio State items. The Clark Gable Foundation had a large table of baskets filled with anything imaginable to take a chance of winning by buying tickets and placing them in a desired bag. Nan Mattern, executive director; Pat Eberly and Joyce Klinger, members and volunteers; and Mary Jane Wood, Foundation member, were there taking down numbers to keep the tickets straight to call the winners. There was a very tall, cackling witch that came to life at the slightest movement as one of the prizes.

  The Cadiz Lions Club started getting ready for hungry breakfast patrons early in the morning and opened at the Wallace Lodge Kitchen at 8 a.m. As per usual, John Tabacchi was manning the griddle for the sausage patties, something that he admits to doing almost every year since the Lions started the breakfasts in the early 1960’s. As chipper as he is with that spatula, one would never guess that he celebrated his 100th birthday on Sept. 7. A party was held to celebrate that great day on Sept. 10 with friends and relatives coming from near and far.

 It was interesting to note that along with the small school house brought to Sally Buffalo Park years back and renovated this year, there is another school that is alive and well for events and host to second grade classes from the county each spring — Ourant School. It was opened in 1873 and renovated a few years ago. Cake walks, reunions, a Fall Festival, Christmas party and the spring elementary classes learning about the “old time 3 R’s” are featured for the students. It is located on Deersville Ridge, Nottingham Township, between Cadiz and Deersville. Tour buses and individuals are welcome to attend. Call Tillie Heavilin at (740) 942-3357 to make arrangements.

Tags: Sally Buffalo Park

LGUs urged to participate in Kabisig expo, trade fair | SunStar – Sun.Star

ORGANIZERS urged local government units (LGUs) in Negros Occidental to participate in the Visayas leg of Kabisig Philippine Government Expo and Trade Fair 2017 on October 17-19 at SMX Convention Center Bacolod.

Daniel Guillen, chairman of the Kabisig Peoples Movement, said in a meeting with participants at the Sugar Workers Development Center in Bacolod, Friday, September 15, that three cities, including Bacolod, Cadiz and San Carlos, committed to take part in the event.

He called on other LGUs to participate and showcase their tourism potentials during the three-day event.

Among those who attended yesterday’s meeting were representatives of the Social Security System, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, Philippine Health Insurance Corporation.

Guillen said that so far, 40 government agencies and institutions have committed to participate, including those coming from Metro Manila.

He added that their goal is to gather about 100 national government agencies, government-owned and controlled corporations, and LGUs as he also invited the private sector to participate.

“The objective is to gather the government in one building,” Guillen said.

“The Kabisig is helping the President inform the public of what is good in government so people will start appreciating them, and not see only the bad things in government,” he added.

Guillen had earlier said the event will coincide with celebration of the MassKara Festival to draw a bigger crowd.

The expo and trade fair will also feature the offerings of cities and municipalities in the Visayas in terms of tourism and investments, he said.

The Kabisig Mindanao Foundation, a non-profit organization based in Davao City, has been initiating that activity in the past 20 years as an information campaign to “bring the good part of the government closer to the public.”

President Rodrigo Duterte issued Memorandum Circular No. 19 encouraging Filipinos to support and participate to learn about the various government agencies and their respective services. (with reports from Julie Ann Gonzales, UNO-R Mass Comm Intern)

These are the municipalities most flooded tourist housing – Turkey Telegraph

Barcelona is city where most flats or rooms offered, but if account is taken of inhabitant, Pollença is town’s most hectic

Cities with most storied resorts in Spain

The past month of July re were 31 Spanish cities with more than 1,500 rental properties for tourists. The majority of m (23) are on mediterranean coast, according to Airdna, a company specialized database that collects and analyses supply of Airbnb, main platform in Spain to offer housing for rent cheap. Add to this increase in use of se flats tour: up to July, 5.6 million international travelers stayed in apartments on ir vacations, according to INE, a 30,81% more than same period of previous year.

The three cities, with most offering holiday homes are Barcelona (22.733 properties in at least one day of July), Madrid (18.433) and Valencia (6.551). Although if you measure tourist pressure by number of properties per resident, ones who suffer most from this phenomenon are Pollença (Balearic islands), with an apartment for every eight residents, Tarifa (Cádiz), a property for every 11 inhabitants; Roses (Girona) and Alcúdia (Balearic islands), both with an apartment on rent for every 12 residents. A very strong pressure on four points of tourist highlights of Spanish coast, which should be even greater when taking into account or platforms like HomeAway. If you look at data overall, in Spain re is a property for every 182 people, only at Airbnb.

With a computer, you can get everything you need for a holiday: buying plane flight, tickets to museums, displacement in site and, of course, accommodation. The Internet has opened avenues for savings for customers once reserved to professionals, and also to do business, in particular through housing of use holiday, whose bid has soared in recent years, especially in coastal areas. In Spain to rent out flats to tourists is not new, but yes that is done in current quantities, through platforms such as Airbnb or HomeAway. In July, it reached in a day an offer of up to 255.183 properties (between self-contained apartments, shared and private rooms offered on Airbnb, a 119% more than same month of 2016.

The data of consulting Airdna show that this type of accommodation grows at same time that turistificación in certain tourist spots. And with this, some problems such as turismofobia, especially in Catalonia and Balearic islands, in a month that will go down in history for being most international travelers arrived in Spain (10.5 million). A social problem that also has economic impacts important. “The hotels re are still in excess of increase in supply of holiday homes because more tourists come. The problem will be when to change trend and let us grow,” warns José Luis Zoreda, vice-chairman and spokesman of Exceltur, a lobby of tourist sector Spanish. According to calculations of Exceltur, number of floors tourist exceeded in 2016 of hotel rooms already in 22 cities.

Moreover, this growth seems to have plateaued. This wave does not cease because it is profitable, despite legal morass in which is into this business. The landlords manage to bring same thing for ten nights rental to tourists for a month to a local resident, eir in beach areas or big cities like Madrid. To avoid this, you are imposing new restrictions. In Balearic islands has established a limit to places tourist legal, in Barcelona, has been forced to close over 2,000 holiday apartments and Madrid is changing rules of Community to restrict this phenomenon. The regulations very restrictive, established in communities like Canary islands, Castile and León and Galicia has collided with laws of jurisdiction, since authority in this matter (CNMC) looks unjustified barriers to entry to apartments in favor of or business like hotels.

Andalusia, a leader for communities

By autonomous communities, Andalusia is one that most cities have between 31 and with more than 1,500 rental properties. In particular, eight towns in andalusia had a higher bid in July (Malaga, Seville, Marbella, Granada, Mijas, Benalmádena, Estepona and Tarifa). It was followed by Valencian Community with six (Valencia, Alicante, Torrevieja, Denia, Calpe and Javea) and Catalonia, Balearic islands and Canary islands, with five.

In Spain, according to data collected by Airdna, supply in July grew by 119% compared to same month of previous year. A growth rate that even exceeds that in cities like Alicante (+139%) and Salou (+285%). In some points like Rate, Roses or Marbella is unknown climb, because re is no data for July 2016.

Among three cities with greatest number of properties on offer, Madrid is one that experienced a major growth (+75%), compared to Valencia (+49%) and Barcelona (+13%). Some increases are justified, mainly, by growing demand for this type of accommodation. In fact, occupation of se housing rentals in July was 60,7%, only one percentage point below that of hotel occupancy, according to Airdna. If you use statistics of INE, occupancy per apartment tourist was 70%, three percentage points less than hotel (73,14%).

Opinion: AB 1000 Would Protect California’s Deserts From Trump – KCET

Commentary: The California desert has always been a target for speculators looking for quick profit, from miners to real estate developers. The latest one, unfortunately, is our President.

The Trump Administration earlier this year exempted a destructive groundwater pumping project in the Mojave Desert from federal review. The Los Angeles-based developer Cadiz, which for decades has unsuccessfully attempted to mine water from the desert, has sought to avoid the same federal review that dashed its hopes in 2002. Cadiz has been given a boost by the Trump Administration, and has seemingly been further advantaged by the appointment of David Bernhardt as Deputy Interior Secretary. Bernhardt was the principal at Cadiz’s chief lobbying firm; that and the stock his company owns in Cadiz became the most significant conflicts of interest raised by many Democratic Senators, including our own Senator Kamala Harris, during his confirmation hearing.

Cadiz Dunes

More About Cadiz

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For over a decade Mel Levine worked to protect the California desert from exactly these types of predators. In 1986, while serving in Congress, he introduced legislation, eventually passed by Senator Diane Feinstein, that created Death Valley National Park, Joshua Tree National Park, and Mojave National Preserve, as well as 3 million acres of Wilderness areas. These parks, just hours away from Los Angeles, are a place for Angelenos to experience nature.

They’re also a huge economic driver of our regional tourism economy, with 3,700 jobs supported in 2016 alone by visits to our three desert National Parks, according to the National Park Service.

The time to defend these natural treasures is now. The California legislature must pass the California Desert Protection Act, Assembly Bill 1000, to protect the water, wildlife, and cultural resources of the stunning California Desert. The bill, sponsored by Assemblymember Laura Friedman, is needed to push back on the Trump Administration, which is undermining our bedrock environmental laws, our public lands policy, and astoundingly — despite their universal popularity — our cherished National Monuments.

In Sacramento on September 1, the State Senate Appropriations committee had the opportunity to move AB 1000 to the Senate floor for a vote.  Unfortunately, AB 1000 did not make it out of committee and is set to expire, which came as a surprise to all of us who support this legislation. Governor Brown supports AB 1000, calling the bill “common sense” and “good policy.” He is joined by Lt. Governor Newsom, Senator Feinstein, the California Democratic Party, LADWP, the environmental community, and thousands of activists, other groups, and businesses across the state.

Story continues below

This large coalition has coalesced not just in support for protecting the desert, but also in response to the enormous scientific concerns surrounding Cadiz. Two federal science agencies, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey, have expressed concern over the accuracy of Cadiz’s scientific claims. Should Cadiz be allowed to move forward without the required federal review that was waived by Donald Trump, the project will damage desert springs and wetlands sacred to Native people, and vital for desert wildlife. Cadiz is also at the center of the controversy over the President’s review of National Monuments. Mojave Trails National Monument is a 1.6-million-acre wonderland that protects dune systems, volcanic fields, mountain ranges, cactus gardens, desert tortoises, desert bighorn sheep, and mountain lions. Congressman Paul Cook has requested that Mojave Trails be reduced by half a million acres. The area he asked to be removed from the monument is needed for Cadiz to pump groundwater.

Cadiz might imperil Mojave Trails' wildlife, such as this black-tailed jackrabbit.

Californians have worked for generations to protect the wild lands of our beautiful state, including our vast, beautiful deserts. AB 1000 would require that water extraction projects in the wild Mojave undergo state agency review to ensure the projects do not harm the natural or cultural resources of the region. That’s why Fran Pavley, past chair of the Senate’s Policy Committee on Natural Resources and Water, and author of the Californian Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, joins other elected officials in support of AB 1000.

There is still time for our leaders in Sacramento to support and pass AB 1000. It is a crucial tool the State can use to resist the Trump Administration’s deregulation of environmental laws. Cadiz, which has benefitted immensely from that deregulation, is the first test of California’s will to stand up to Trump to defend our public lands. Kevin DeLeon and Senate leadership have committed to protect us from harms done by the Trump administration. We still have an opportunity to do so through AB 1000. The writers of this article urge readers to call their State Senators and ask them to pass AB 1000.

Opinion: AB 1000 Would Protect California’s Deserts From Trump – KCET

Commentary: The California desert has always been a target for speculators looking for quick profit, from miners to real estate developers. The latest one, unfortunately, is our President.

The Trump Administration earlier this year exempted a destructive groundwater pumping project in the Mojave Desert from federal review. The Los Angeles-based developer Cadiz, which for decades has unsuccessfully attempted to mine water from the desert, has sought to avoid the same federal review that dashed its hopes in 2002. Cadiz has been given a boost by the Trump Administration, and has seemingly been further advantaged by the appointment of David Bernhardt as Deputy Interior Secretary. Bernhardt was the principal at Cadiz’s chief lobbying firm; that and the stock his company owns in Cadiz became the most significant conflicts of interest raised by many Democratic Senators, including our own Senator Kamala Harris, during his confirmation hearing.

Cadiz Dunes

More About Cadiz

  •  
  • 1 of 3
  • next ›

For over a decade Mel Levine worked to protect the California desert from exactly these types of predators. In 1986, while serving in Congress, he introduced legislation, eventually passed by Senator Diane Feinstein, that created Death Valley National Park, Joshua Tree National Park, and Mojave National Preserve, as well as 3 million acres of Wilderness areas. These parks, just hours away from Los Angeles, are a place for Angelenos to experience nature.

They’re also a huge economic driver of our regional tourism economy, with 3,700 jobs supported in 2016 alone by visits to our three desert National Parks, according to the National Park Service.

The time to defend these natural treasures is now. The California legislature must pass the California Desert Protection Act, Assembly Bill 1000, to protect the water, wildlife, and cultural resources of the stunning California Desert. The bill, sponsored by Assemblymember Laura Friedman, is needed to push back on the Trump Administration, which is undermining our bedrock environmental laws, our public lands policy, and astoundingly — despite their universal popularity — our cherished National Monuments.

In Sacramento on September 1, the State Senate Appropriations committee had the opportunity to move AB 1000 to the Senate floor for a vote.  Unfortunately, AB 1000 did not make it out of committee and is set to expire, which came as a surprise to all of us who support this legislation. Governor Brown supports AB 1000, calling the bill “common sense” and “good policy.” He is joined by Lt. Governor Newsom, Senator Feinstein, the California Democratic Party, LADWP, the environmental community, and thousands of activists, other groups, and businesses across the state.

Story continues below

This large coalition has coalesced not just in support for protecting the desert, but also in response to the enormous scientific concerns surrounding Cadiz. Two federal science agencies, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey, have expressed concern over the accuracy of Cadiz’s scientific claims. Should Cadiz be allowed to move forward without the required federal review that was waived by Donald Trump, the project will damage desert springs and wetlands sacred to Native people, and vital for desert wildlife. Cadiz is also at the center of the controversy over the President’s review of National Monuments. Mojave Trails National Monument is a 1.6-million-acre wonderland that protects dune systems, volcanic fields, mountain ranges, cactus gardens, desert tortoises, desert bighorn sheep, and mountain lions. Congressman Paul Cook has requested that Mojave Trails be reduced by half a million acres. The area he asked to be removed from the monument is needed for Cadiz to pump groundwater.

Cadiz might imperil Mojave Trails' wildlife, such as this black-tailed jackrabbit.

Californians have worked for generations to protect the wild lands of our beautiful state, including our vast, beautiful deserts. AB 1000 would require that water extraction projects in the wild Mojave undergo state agency review to ensure the projects do not harm the natural or cultural resources of the region. That’s why Fran Pavley, past chair of the Senate’s Policy Committee on Natural Resources and Water, and author of the Californian Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, joins other elected officials in support of AB 1000.

There is still time for our leaders in Sacramento to support and pass AB 1000. It is a crucial tool the State can use to resist the Trump Administration’s deregulation of environmental laws. Cadiz, which has benefitted immensely from that deregulation, is the first test of California’s will to stand up to Trump to defend our public lands. Kevin DeLeon and Senate leadership have committed to protect us from harms done by the Trump administration. We still have an opportunity to do so through AB 1000. The writers of this article urge readers to call their State Senators and ask them to pass AB 1000.

Opinion: AB 1000 Would Protect California’s Deserts From Trump … – KCET

Commentary: The California desert has always been a target for speculators looking for quick profit, from miners to real estate developers. The latest one, unfortunately, is our President.

The Trump Administration earlier this year exempted a destructive groundwater pumping project in the Mojave Desert from federal review. The Los Angeles-based developer Cadiz, which for decades has unsuccessfully attempted to mine water from the desert, has sought to avoid the same federal review that dashed its hopes in 2002. Cadiz has been given a boost by the Trump Administration, and has seemingly been further advantaged by the appointment of David Bernhardt as Deputy Interior Secretary. Bernhardt was the principal at Cadiz’s chief lobbying firm; that and the stock his company owns in Cadiz became the most significant conflicts of interest raised by many Democratic Senators, including our own Senator Kamala Harris, during his confirmation hearing.

Cadiz Dunes

More About Cadiz

  •  
  • 1 of 3
  • next ›

For over a decade Mel Levine worked to protect the California desert from exactly these types of predators. In 1986, while serving in Congress, he introduced legislation, eventually passed by Senator Diane Feinstein, that created Death Valley National Park, Joshua Tree National Park, and Mojave National Preserve, as well as 3 million acres of Wilderness areas. These parks, just hours away from Los Angeles, are a place for Angelenos to experience nature.

They’re also a huge economic driver of our regional tourism economy, with 3,700 jobs supported in 2016 alone by visits to our three desert National Parks, according to the National Park Service.

The time to defend these natural treasures is now. The California legislature must pass the California Desert Protection Act, Assembly Bill 1000, to protect the water, wildlife, and cultural resources of the stunning California Desert. The bill, sponsored by Assemblymember Laura Friedman, is needed to push back on the Trump Administration, which is undermining our bedrock environmental laws, our public lands policy, and astoundingly — despite their universal popularity — our cherished National Monuments.

In Sacramento on September 1, the State Senate Appropriations committee had the opportunity to move AB 1000 to the Senate floor for a vote.  Unfortunately, AB 1000 did not make it out of committee and is set to expire, which came as a surprise to all of us who support this legislation. Governor Brown supports AB 1000, calling the bill “common sense” and “good policy.” He is joined by Lt. Governor Newsom, Senator Feinstein, the California Democratic Party, LADWP, the environmental community, and thousands of activists, other groups, and businesses across the state.

Story continues below

This large coalition has coalesced not just in support for protecting the desert, but also in response to the enormous scientific concerns surrounding Cadiz. Two federal science agencies, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey, have expressed concern over the accuracy of Cadiz’s scientific claims. Should Cadiz be allowed to move forward without the required federal review that was waived by Donald Trump, the project will damage desert springs and wetlands sacred to Native people, and vital for desert wildlife. Cadiz is also at the center of the controversy over the President’s review of National Monuments. Mojave Trails National Monument is a 1.6-million-acre wonderland that protects dune systems, volcanic fields, mountain ranges, cactus gardens, desert tortoises, desert bighorn sheep, and mountain lions. Congressman Paul Cook has requested that Mojave Trails be reduced by half a million acres. The area he asked to be removed from the monument is needed for Cadiz to pump groundwater.

Cadiz might imperil Mojave Trails' wildlife, such as this black-tailed jackrabbit.

Californians have worked for generations to protect the wild lands of our beautiful state, including our vast, beautiful deserts. AB 1000 would require that water extraction projects in the wild Mojave undergo state agency review to ensure the projects do not harm the natural or cultural resources of the region. That’s why Fran Pavley, past chair of the Senate’s Policy Committee on Natural Resources and Water, and author of the Californian Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, joins other elected officials in support of AB 1000.

There is still time for our leaders in Sacramento to support and pass AB 1000. It is a crucial tool the State can use to resist the Trump Administration’s deregulation of environmental laws. Cadiz, which has benefitted immensely from that deregulation, is the first test of California’s will to stand up to Trump to defend our public lands. Kevin DeLeon and Senate leadership have committed to protect us from harms done by the Trump administration. We still have an opportunity to do so through AB 1000. The writers of this article urge readers to call their State Senators and ask them to pass AB 1000.

Opinion: AB 1000 Would Protect California’s Deserts From Trump – KCET

Commentary: The California desert has always been a target for speculators looking for quick profit, from miners to real estate developers. The latest one, unfortunately, is our President.

The Trump Administration earlier this year exempted a destructive groundwater pumping project in the Mojave Desert from federal review. The Los Angeles-based developer Cadiz, which for decades has unsuccessfully attempted to mine water from the desert, has sought to avoid the same federal review that dashed its hopes in 2002. Cadiz has been given a boost by the Trump Administration, and has seemingly been further advantaged by the appointment of David Bernhardt as Deputy Interior Secretary. Bernhardt was the principal at Cadiz’s chief lobbying firm; that and the stock his company owns in Cadiz became the most significant conflicts of interest raised by many Democratic Senators, including our own Senator Kamala Harris, during his confirmation hearing.

Cadiz Dunes

More About Cadiz

  •  
  • 1 of 3
  • next ›

For over a decade Mel Levine worked to protect the California desert from exactly these types of predators. In 1986, while serving in Congress, he introduced legislation, eventually passed by Senator Diane Feinstein, that created Death Valley National Park, Joshua Tree National Park, and Mojave National Preserve, as well as 3 million acres of Wilderness areas. These parks, just hours away from Los Angeles, are a place for Angelenos to experience nature.

They’re also a huge economic driver of our regional tourism economy, with 3,700 jobs supported in 2016 alone by visits to our three desert National Parks, according to the National Park Service.

The time to defend these natural treasures is now. The California legislature must pass the California Desert Protection Act, Assembly Bill 1000, to protect the water, wildlife, and cultural resources of the stunning California Desert. The bill, sponsored by Assemblymember Laura Friedman, is needed to push back on the Trump Administration, which is undermining our bedrock environmental laws, our public lands policy, and astoundingly — despite their universal popularity — our cherished National Monuments.

In Sacramento on September 1, the State Senate Appropriations committee had the opportunity to move AB 1000 to the Senate floor for a vote.  Unfortunately, AB 1000 did not make it out of committee and is set to expire, which came as a surprise to all of us who support this legislation. Governor Brown supports AB 1000, calling the bill “common sense” and “good policy.” He is joined by Lt. Governor Newsom, Senator Feinstein, the California Democratic Party, LADWP, the environmental community, and thousands of activists, other groups, and businesses across the state.

Story continues below

This large coalition has coalesced not just in support for protecting the desert, but also in response to the enormous scientific concerns surrounding Cadiz. Two federal science agencies, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey, have expressed concern over the accuracy of Cadiz’s scientific claims. Should Cadiz be allowed to move forward without the required federal review that was waived by Donald Trump, the project will damage desert springs and wetlands sacred to Native people, and vital for desert wildlife. Cadiz is also at the center of the controversy over the President’s review of National Monuments. Mojave Trails National Monument is a 1.6-million-acre wonderland that protects dune systems, volcanic fields, mountain ranges, cactus gardens, desert tortoises, desert bighorn sheep, and mountain lions. Congressman Paul Cook has requested that Mojave Trails be reduced by half a million acres. The area he asked to be removed from the monument is needed for Cadiz to pump groundwater.

Cadiz might imperil Mojave Trails' wildlife, such as this black-tailed jackrabbit.

Californians have worked for generations to protect the wild lands of our beautiful state, including our vast, beautiful deserts. AB 1000 would require that water extraction projects in the wild Mojave undergo state agency review to ensure the projects do not harm the natural or cultural resources of the region. That’s why Fran Pavley, past chair of the Senate’s Policy Committee on Natural Resources and Water, and author of the Californian Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, joins other elected officials in support of AB 1000.

There is still time for our leaders in Sacramento to support and pass AB 1000. It is a crucial tool the State can use to resist the Trump Administration’s deregulation of environmental laws. Cadiz, which has benefitted immensely from that deregulation, is the first test of California’s will to stand up to Trump to defend our public lands. Kevin DeLeon and Senate leadership have committed to protect us from harms done by the Trump administration. We still have an opportunity to do so through AB 1000. The writers of this article urge readers to call their State Senators and ask them to pass AB 1000.

Opinion: AB 1000 Would Protect California’s Deserts From Trump – KCET

Commentary: The California desert has always been a target for speculators looking for quick profit, from miners to real estate developers. The latest one, unfortunately, is our President.

The Trump Administration earlier this year exempted a destructive groundwater pumping project in the Mojave Desert from federal review. The Los Angeles-based developer Cadiz, which for decades has unsuccessfully attempted to mine water from the desert, has sought to avoid the same federal review that dashed its hopes in 2002. Cadiz has been given a boost by the Trump Administration, and has seemingly been further advantaged by the appointment of David Bernhardt as Deputy Interior Secretary. Bernhardt was the principal at Cadiz’s chief lobbying firm; that and the stock his company owns in Cadiz became the most significant conflicts of interest raised by many Democratic Senators, including our own Senator Harris, during his confirmation hearing.

Cadiz Dunes

More About Cadiz

  •  
  • 1 of 3
  • next ›

For over a decade Mel Levine worked to protect the California desert from exactly these types of predators. In 1986, while serving in Congress, he introduced legislation, eventually passed by Senator Diane Feinstein, that created Death Valley National Park, Joshua Tree National Park, and Mojave National Preserve, as well as 3 million acres of Wilderness areas. These parks, just hours away from Los Angeles, are a place for Angelenos to experience nature.

They’re also a huge economic driver of our regional tourism economy, with 3,700 jobs supported in 2016 alone by visits to our three desert National Parks, according to the National Park Service.

The time to defend these natural treasures is now. The California legislature must pass the California Desert Protection Act, Assembly Bill 1000, to protect the water, wildlife, and cultural resources of the stunning California Desert. The bill, sponsored by Assemblymember Laura Friedman, is needed to push back on the Trump Administration, which is undermining our bedrock environmental laws, our public lands policy, and astoundingly — despite their universal popularity — our cherished National Monuments.

In Sacramento on September 1, the State Senate Appropriations committee had the opportunity to move AB 1000 to the Senate floor for a vote.  Unfortunately, AB 1000 did not make it out of committee and is set to expire, which came as a surprise to all of us who support this legislation. Governor Brown supports AB 1000, calling the bill “common sense” and “good policy.” He is joined by Lt. Governor Newsom, Senator Feinstein, the California Democratic Party, LADWP, the environmental community, and thousands of activists, other groups, and businesses across the state.

Story continues below

This large coalition has coalesced not just in support for protecting the desert, but also in response to the enormous scientific concerns surrounding Cadiz. Two federal science agencies, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey, have expressed concern over the accuracy of Cadiz’s scientific claims. Should Cadiz be allowed to move forward without the required federal review that was waived by Donald Trump, the project will damage desert springs and wetlands sacred to Native people, and vital for desert wildlife. Cadiz is also at the center of the controversy over the President’s review of National Monuments. Mojave Trails National Monument is a 1.6-million-acre wonderland that protects dune systems, volcanic fields, mountain ranges, cactus gardens, desert tortoises, desert bighorn sheep, and mountain lions. Congressman Paul Cook has requested that Mojave Trails be reduced by half a million acres. The area he asked to be removed from the monument is needed for Cadiz to pump groundwater.

Cadiz might imperil Mojave Trails' wildlife, such as this black-tailed jackrabbit.

Californians have worked for generations to protect the wild lands of our beautiful state, including our vast, beautiful deserts. AB 1000 would require that water extraction projects in the wild Mojave undergo state agency review to ensure the projects do not harm the natural or cultural resources of the region. That’s why Fran Pavley, past chair of the Senate’s Policy Committee on Natural Resources and Water, and author of the Californian Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, joins other elected officials in support of AB 1000.

There is still time for our leaders in Sacramento to support and pass AB 1000. It is a crucial tool the State can use to resist the Trump Administration’s deregulation of environmental laws. Cadiz, which has benefitted immensely from that deregulation, is the first test of California’s will to stand up to Trump to defend our public lands. Kevin DeLeon and Senate leadership have committed to protect us from harms done by the Trump administration. We still have an opportunity to do so through AB 1000. We urge readers to call their State Senators and ask them to pass AB 1000.

Opinion: AB 1000 Would Protect California’s Deserts From Trump – KCET

Commentary: The California desert has always been a target for speculators looking for quick profit, from miners to real estate developers. The latest one, unfortunately, is our President.

The Trump Administration earlier this year exempted a destructive groundwater pumping project in the Mojave Desert from federal review. The Los Angeles-based developer Cadiz, which for decades has unsuccessfully attempted to mine water from the desert, has sought to avoid the same federal review that dashed its hopes in 2002. Cadiz has been given a boost by the Trump Administration, and has seemingly been further advantaged by the appointment of David Bernhardt as Deputy Interior Secretary. Bernhardt was the principal at Cadiz’s chief lobbying firm; that and the stock his company owns in Cadiz became the most significant conflicts of interest raised by many Democratic Senators, including our own Senator Kamala Harris, during his confirmation hearing.

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For over a decade Mel Levine worked to protect the California desert from exactly these types of predators. In 1986, while serving in Congress, he introduced legislation, eventually passed by Senator Diane Feinstein, that created Death Valley National Park, Joshua Tree National Park, and Mojave National Preserve, as well as 3 million acres of Wilderness areas. These parks, just hours away from Los Angeles, are a place for Angelenos to experience nature.

They’re also a huge economic driver of our regional tourism economy, with 3,700 jobs supported in 2016 alone by visits to our three desert National Parks, according to the National Park Service.

The time to defend these natural treasures is now. The California legislature must pass the California Desert Protection Act, Assembly Bill 1000, to protect the water, wildlife, and cultural resources of the stunning California Desert. The bill, sponsored by Assemblymember Laura Friedman, is needed to push back on the Trump Administration, which is undermining our bedrock environmental laws, our public lands policy, and astoundingly — despite their universal popularity — our cherished National Monuments.

In Sacramento on September 1, the State Senate Appropriations committee had the opportunity to move AB 1000 to the Senate floor for a vote.  Unfortunately, AB 1000 did not make it out of committee and is set to expire, which came as a surprise to all of us who support this legislation. Governor Brown supports AB 1000, calling the bill “common sense” and “good policy.” He is joined by Lt. Governor Newsom, Senator Feinstein, the California Democratic Party, LADWP, the environmental community, and thousands of activists, other groups, and businesses across the state.

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This large coalition has coalesced not just in support for protecting the desert, but also in response to the enormous scientific concerns surrounding Cadiz. Two federal science agencies, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey, have expressed concern over the accuracy of Cadiz’s scientific claims. Should Cadiz be allowed to move forward without the required federal review that was waived by Donald Trump, the project will damage desert springs and wetlands sacred to Native people, and vital for desert wildlife. Cadiz is also at the center of the controversy over the President’s review of National Monuments. Mojave Trails National Monument is a 1.6-million-acre wonderland that protects dune systems, volcanic fields, mountain ranges, cactus gardens, desert tortoises, desert bighorn sheep, and mountain lions. Congressman Paul Cook has requested that Mojave Trails be reduced by half a million acres. The area he asked to be removed from the monument is needed for Cadiz to pump groundwater.

Cadiz might imperil Mojave Trails' wildlife, such as this black-tailed jackrabbit.

Californians have worked for generations to protect the wild lands of our beautiful state, including our vast, beautiful deserts. AB 1000 would require that water extraction projects in the wild Mojave undergo state agency review to ensure the projects do not harm the natural or cultural resources of the region. That’s why Fran Pavley, past chair of the Senate’s Policy Committee on Natural Resources and Water, and author of the Californian Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, joins other elected officials in support of AB 1000.

There is still time for our leaders in Sacramento to support and pass AB 1000. It is a crucial tool the State can use to resist the Trump Administration’s deregulation of environmental laws. Cadiz, which has benefitted immensely from that deregulation, is the first test of California’s will to stand up to Trump to defend our public lands. Kevin DeLeon and Senate leadership have committed to protect us from harms done by the Trump administration. We still have an opportunity to do so through AB 1000. The writers of this article urge readers to call their State Senators and ask them to pass AB 1000.