Trooper arrested Cadiz man after vehicle pursuit and crash – WPSD Local 6

Preston Hightower

CADIZ, KY (WPSD) — A Cadiz man was arrested Monday night after he allegedly fled from Kentucky State Police and then crashed.

Around 11:00 p.m., a trooper driving on Main Street in Cadiz, tried to stop a Ford SUV for speeding and having no registration.

The driver did not stop and instead accelerated to speeds of over 100 miles per hour on Highway 68/80 and then on Kings Chapel Road.

While on Kings Chapel Road, the driver lost control of the SUV, causing it to roll over numerous times.

The driver, 22-year-old Preston Hightower of Cadiz, was treated at the scene for minor injuries. His passenger, 22-year-old Leslie Sisco of Hopkinsville, was taken to a local hospital for treatment of non-life threatening injuries.

Hightower was arrested and charged with speeding, no registration plates, first degree fleeing or evading police in a motor vehicle, first degree wanton endangerment, aggravated driving under the influence, operating on a suspended license, no insurance, and possession of marijuana. He was taken to the Christian County Jail.

Cadiz Water Project should be nixed – Hesperia Star


Pumping large amounts water out of our beloved Mojave Desert seems like a strange concept, especially if the water is going to be sent to areas like Orange County. Yet a water extraction project is currently in the works, supported by Rep. Paul Cook, and officially known as the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project. This water extraction and transfer will be conducted by a corporation, Cadiz, Inc., drawing down vital desert aquifers in the Fenner, Bristol and Cadiz valleys (east of Barstow, near Interstate 40).

Cadiz, Inc. plans to pump 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year for 50 years from the aquifer. To put this into perspective, that’s 16 billion gallons per year, or about 520 gallons each second. Strangely, project proponents say this will actually “conserve” water lost to evaporation in the hot desert, yet the most recent independent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey state this is about five times the aquifer’s recharge rate. Rain and snow puts only 2,000 to 10,000 acre-feet of water back into the aquifer each year, significantly less than what Cadiz, Inc. would pump out.

Also, the National Park Service and independent scientists feel this groundwater is linked to various springs in our desert areas, which wildlife and riparian vegetation depend on. Cadiz’s pumping would most likely cause these springs to dry up. If they are correct, by the time the damage to the springs is detectable, it would be too late to do anything to save them.

If this water extraction project proceeds, it could contribute to an environmental disaster for our Mojave Desert which depends on the underground aquifers and springs. So much life in our desert could be jeopardized, such as tortoises, bighorn sheep, Joshua trees, bobcats, yearly wildflower blooms, migratory birds, and so on. Knowing this, Cadiz, Inc. is attempting to avoid federal oversight by running its water transfer pipeline along a railroad line and using an obscure 1875 law to claim exemption from environmental review by using the railroad right-of-way.

For the most part, this article covers just a portion of the story. Some of you might already know about the Cadiz Water Project, but I think many of you do not. I only started hearing about it this year and it raised some red flags and concerns in my mind. I hope this information will spark your interest in doing further research of your own and contacting our elected officials with your thoughts and concerns.

Here are some things to think about and look into: Why is our Congressional representative supporting pumping water out of the Mojave aquifer and sending it to Orange County? Should there be concern about Department of Interior Deputy Secretary David Bernhardt’s connections with Cadiz, Inc., as the Cadiz project needs federal permits? In addition to environmental issues, will this loss from desert aquifers affect our desert community residents in the future?

State Assembly bill AB1000, introduced last July, bolsters state reviews and attempts to ensure that transfers of our desert groundwater do not adversely affect our region’s natural and cultural resources. I found our local Mojave Water Agency (MWA) opposes the bill as written, but only due to lack of clarity in some of the wording. If amended and clarified appropriately, the Agency could remove its opposition.

Again, I urge my fellow desert citizens to look into this issue, form you own opinions, and let our elected officials hear from you.

Davis Hansen is a Cal State L.A. graduate, military veteran, and former corporate executive who lives in Hesperia.

 

Cadiz Water Project should be nixed – News – HesperiaStar.com … – Hesperia Star


Pumping large amounts water out of our beloved Mojave Desert seems like a strange concept, especially if the water is going to be sent to areas like Orange County. Yet a water extraction project is currently in the works, supported by Rep. Paul Cook, and officially known as the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project. This water extraction and transfer will be conducted by a corporation, Cadiz, Inc., drawing down vital desert aquifers in the Fenner, Bristol and Cadiz valleys (east of Barstow, near Interstate 40).

Cadiz, Inc. plans to pump 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year for 50 years from the aquifer. To put this into perspective, that’s 16 billion gallons per year, or about 520 gallons each second. Strangely, project proponents say this will actually “conserve” water lost to evaporation in the hot desert, yet the most recent independent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey state this is about five times the aquifer’s recharge rate. Rain and snow puts only 2,000 to 10,000 acre-feet of water back into the aquifer each year, significantly less than what Cadiz, Inc. would pump out.

Also, the National Park Service and independent scientists feel this groundwater is linked to various springs in our desert areas, which wildlife and riparian vegetation depend on. Cadiz’s pumping would most likely cause these springs to dry up. If they are correct, by the time the damage to the springs is detectable, it would be too late to do anything to save them.

If this water extraction project proceeds, it could contribute to an environmental disaster for our Mojave Desert which depends on the underground aquifers and springs. So much life in our desert could be jeopardized, such as tortoises, bighorn sheep, Joshua trees, bobcats, yearly wildflower blooms, migratory birds, and so on. Knowing this, Cadiz, Inc. is attempting to avoid federal oversight by running its water transfer pipeline along a railroad line and using an obscure 1875 law to claim exemption from environmental review by using the railroad right-of-way.

For the most part, this article covers just a portion of the story. Some of you might already know about the Cadiz Water Project, but I think many of you do not. I only started hearing about it this year and it raised some red flags and concerns in my mind. I hope this information will spark your interest in doing further research of your own and contacting our elected officials with your thoughts and concerns.

Here are some things to think about and look into: Why is our Congressional representative supporting pumping water out of the Mojave aquifer and sending it to Orange County? Should there be concern about Department of Interior Deputy Secretary David Bernhardt’s connections with Cadiz, Inc., as the Cadiz project needs federal permits? In addition to environmental issues, will this loss from desert aquifers affect our desert community residents in the future?

State Assembly bill AB1000, introduced last July, bolsters state reviews and attempts to ensure that transfers of our desert groundwater do not adversely affect our region’s natural and cultural resources. I found our local Mojave Water Agency (MWA) opposes the bill as written, but only due to lack of clarity in some of the wording. If amended and clarified appropriately, the Agency could remove its opposition.

Again, I urge my fellow desert citizens to look into this issue, form you own opinions, and let our elected officials hear from you.

Davis Hansen is a Cal State L.A. graduate, military veteran, and former corporate executive who lives in Hesperia.

 

Betty Ferrell – Harrison News Herald

Betty Ferrell, 90, of Cadiz, died Monday, Sept. 11, 2017 at Gables Care Center, Hopedale. She was born June 25, 1927 in Adena, Ohio, a daughter of the late Roy O. and Mary Jane Barcus Leggett.

Betty was the owner and operator of Betty’s Beauty Salon in Cadiz for many years. She participated in the Foster Grandparents Program for 20 years, and was a member of the Cadiz Jr. Women’s Club. She was an avid reader and loved working with children.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Charles S. Ferrell in 1978; three sisters, Gladys Yost, Mae Roberts, and Helen Leggett; and a brother Roy Leggett. Surviving are her three children, Kathy Miller (Butch), Timothy Charles Ferrell and Jamie Muze (Curt Nelson), all of Cadiz; six grandchildren; and eleven great grandchildren.

Private services will be held at the convenience of the family. Interment will be in Cadiz Union Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family asks for memorial contributions to the Harrison Hills City School District Library Program. Online condolences may be made at www.clark-kirkland.com.

Cadiz Water Project should be nixed – VVdailypress.com – VVdailypress.com


Pumping large amounts water out of our beloved Mojave Desert seems like a strange concept, especially if the water is going to be sent to areas like Orange County. Yet a water extraction project is currently in the works, supported by Rep. Paul Cook, and officially known as the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project. This water extraction and transfer will be conducted by a corporation, Cadiz, Inc., drawing down vital desert aquifers in the Fenner, Bristol and Cadiz valleys (east of Barstow, near Interstate 40).

Cadiz, Inc. plans to pump 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year for 50 years from the aquifer. To put this into perspective, that’s 16 billion gallons per year, or about 520 gallons each second. Strangely, project proponents say this will actually “conserve” water lost to evaporation in the hot desert, yet the most recent independent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey state this is about five times the aquifer’s recharge rate. Rain and snow puts only 2,000 to 10,000 acre-feet of water back into the aquifer each year, significantly less than what Cadiz, Inc. would pump out.

Also, the National Park Service and independent scientists feel this groundwater is linked to various springs in our desert areas, which wildlife and riparian vegetation depend on. Cadiz’s pumping would most likely cause these springs to dry up. If they are correct, by the time the damage to the springs is detectable, it would be too late to do anything to save them.

If this water extraction project proceeds, it could contribute to an environmental disaster for our Mojave Desert which depends on the underground aquifers and springs. So much life in our desert could be jeopardized, such as tortoises, bighorn sheep, Joshua trees, bobcats, yearly wildflower blooms, migratory birds, and so on. Knowing this, Cadiz, Inc. is attempting to avoid federal oversight by running its water transfer pipeline along a railroad line and using an obscure 1875 law to claim exemption from environmental review by using the railroad right-of-way.

For the most part, this article covers just a portion of the story. Some of you might already know about the Cadiz Water Project, but I think many of you do not. I only started hearing about it this year and it raised some red flags and concerns in my mind. I hope this information will spark your interest in doing further research of your own and contacting our elected officials with your thoughts and concerns.

Here are some things to think about and look into: Why is our Congressional representative supporting pumping water out of the Mojave aquifer and sending it to Orange County? Should there be concern about Department of Interior Deputy Secretary David Bernhardt’s connections with Cadiz, Inc., as the Cadiz project needs federal permits? In addition to environmental issues, will this loss from desert aquifers affect our desert community residents in the future?

State Assembly bill AB1000, introduced last July, bolsters state reviews and attempts to ensure that transfers of our desert groundwater do not adversely affect our region’s natural and cultural resources. I found our local Mojave Water Agency (MWA) opposes the bill as written, but only due to lack of clarity in some of the wording. If amended and clarified appropriately, the Agency could remove its opposition.

Again, I urge my fellow desert citizens to look into this issue, form you own opinions, and let our elected officials hear from you.

Davis Hansen is a Cal State L.A. graduate, military veteran, and former corporate executive who lives in Hesperia.

 

Cadiz Water Project should be nixed – Desert Dispatch – Desert Dispatch


Pumping large amounts water out of our beloved Mojave Desert seems like a strange concept, especially if the water is going to be sent to areas like Orange County. Yet a water extraction project is currently in the works, supported by Rep. Paul Cook, and officially known as the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project. This water extraction and transfer will be conducted by a corporation, Cadiz, Inc., drawing down vital desert aquifers in the Fenner, Bristol and Cadiz valleys (east of Barstow, near Interstate 40).

Cadiz, Inc. plans to pump 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year for 50 years from the aquifer. To put this into perspective, that’s 16 billion gallons per year, or about 520 gallons each second. Strangely, project proponents say this will actually “conserve” water lost to evaporation in the hot desert, yet the most recent independent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey state this is about five times the aquifer’s recharge rate. Rain and snow puts only 2,000 to 10,000 acre-feet of water back into the aquifer each year, significantly less than what Cadiz, Inc. would pump out.

Also, the National Park Service and independent scientists feel this groundwater is linked to various springs in our desert areas, which wildlife and riparian vegetation depend on. Cadiz’s pumping would most likely cause these springs to dry up. If they are correct, by the time the damage to the springs is detectable, it would be too late to do anything to save them.

If this water extraction project proceeds, it could contribute to an environmental disaster for our Mojave Desert which depends on the underground aquifers and springs. So much life in our desert could be jeopardized, such as tortoises, bighorn sheep, Joshua trees, bobcats, yearly wildflower blooms, migratory birds, and so on. Knowing this, Cadiz, Inc. is attempting to avoid federal oversight by running its water transfer pipeline along a railroad line and using an obscure 1875 law to claim exemption from environmental review by using the railroad right-of-way.

For the most part, this article covers just a portion of the story. Some of you might already know about the Cadiz Water Project, but I think many of you do not. I only started hearing about it this year and it raised some red flags and concerns in my mind. I hope this information will spark your interest in doing further research of your own and contacting our elected officials with your thoughts and concerns.

Here are some things to think about and look into: Why is our Congressional representative supporting pumping water out of the Mojave aquifer and sending it to Orange County? Should there be concern about Department of Interior Deputy Secretary David Bernhardt’s connections with Cadiz, Inc., as the Cadiz project needs federal permits? In addition to environmental issues, will this loss from desert aquifers affect our desert community residents in the future?

State Assembly bill AB1000, introduced last July, bolsters state reviews and attempts to ensure that transfers of our desert groundwater do not adversely affect our region’s natural and cultural resources. I found our local Mojave Water Agency (MWA) opposes the bill as written, but only due to lack of clarity in some of the wording. If amended and clarified appropriately, the Agency could remove its opposition.

Again, I urge my fellow desert citizens to look into this issue, form you own opinions, and let our elected officials hear from you.

Davis Hansen is a Cal State L.A. graduate, military veteran, and former corporate executive who lives in Hesperia.

 

Cadiz Water Project should be nixed – Desert Dispatch


Pumping large amounts water out of our beloved Mojave Desert seems like a strange concept, especially if the water is going to be sent to areas like Orange County. Yet a water extraction project is currently in the works, supported by Rep. Paul Cook, and officially known as the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project. This water extraction and transfer will be conducted by a corporation, Cadiz, Inc., drawing down vital desert aquifers in the Fenner, Bristol and Cadiz valleys (east of Barstow, near Interstate 40).

Cadiz, Inc. plans to pump 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year for 50 years from the aquifer. To put this into perspective, that’s 16 billion gallons per year, or about 520 gallons each second. Strangely, project proponents say this will actually “conserve” water lost to evaporation in the hot desert, yet the most recent independent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey state this is about five times the aquifer’s recharge rate. Rain and snow puts only 2,000 to 10,000 acre-feet of water back into the aquifer each year, significantly less than what Cadiz, Inc. would pump out.

Also, the National Park Service and independent scientists feel this groundwater is linked to various springs in our desert areas, which wildlife and riparian vegetation depend on. Cadiz’s pumping would most likely cause these springs to dry up. If they are correct, by the time the damage to the springs is detectable, it would be too late to do anything to save them.

If this water extraction project proceeds, it could contribute to an environmental disaster for our Mojave Desert which depends on the underground aquifers and springs. So much life in our desert could be jeopardized, such as tortoises, bighorn sheep, Joshua trees, bobcats, yearly wildflower blooms, migratory birds, and so on. Knowing this, Cadiz, Inc. is attempting to avoid federal oversight by running its water transfer pipeline along a railroad line and using an obscure 1875 law to claim exemption from environmental review by using the railroad right-of-way.

For the most part, this article covers just a portion of the story. Some of you might already know about the Cadiz Water Project, but I think many of you do not. I only started hearing about it this year and it raised some red flags and concerns in my mind. I hope this information will spark your interest in doing further research of your own and contacting our elected officials with your thoughts and concerns.

Here are some things to think about and look into: Why is our Congressional representative supporting pumping water out of the Mojave aquifer and sending it to Orange County? Should there be concern about Department of Interior Deputy Secretary David Bernhardt’s connections with Cadiz, Inc., as the Cadiz project needs federal permits? In addition to environmental issues, will this loss from desert aquifers affect our desert community residents in the future?

State Assembly bill AB1000, introduced last July, bolsters state reviews and attempts to ensure that transfers of our desert groundwater do not adversely affect our region’s natural and cultural resources. I found our local Mojave Water Agency (MWA) opposes the bill as written, but only due to lack of clarity in some of the wording. If amended and clarified appropriately, the Agency could remove its opposition.

Again, I urge my fellow desert citizens to look into this issue, form you own opinions, and let our elected officials hear from you.

Davis Hansen is a Cal State L.A. graduate, military veteran, and former corporate executive who lives in Hesperia.

 

Valley Voices: Cadiz Water Project should be nixed – VVdailypress.com


Pumping large amounts water out of our beloved Mojave Desert seems like a strange concept, especially if the water is going to be sent to areas like Orange County. Yet a water extraction project is currently in the works, supported by Rep. Paul Cook, and officially known as the Cadiz Valley Water Conservation, Recovery and Storage Project. This water extraction and transfer will be conducted by a corporation, Cadiz, Inc., drawing down vital desert aquifers in the Fenner, Bristol and Cadiz valleys (east of Barstow, near Interstate 40).

Cadiz, Inc. plans to pump 50,000 acre-feet of groundwater per year for 50 years from the aquifer. To put this into perspective, that’s 16 billion gallons per year, or about 520 gallons each second. Strangely, project proponents say this will actually “conserve” water lost to evaporation in the hot desert, yet the most recent independent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey state this is about five times the aquifer’s recharge rate. Rain and snow puts only 2,000 to 10,000 acre-feet of water back into the aquifer each year, significantly less than what Cadiz, Inc. would pump out.

Also, the National Park Service and independent scientists feel this groundwater is linked to various springs in our desert areas, which wildlife and riparian vegetation depend on. Cadiz’s pumping would most likely cause these springs to dry up. If they are correct, by the time the damage to the springs is detectable, it would be too late to do anything to save them.

If this water extraction project proceeds, it could contribute to an environmental disaster for our Mojave Desert which depends on the underground aquifers and springs. So much life in our desert could be jeopardized, such as tortoises, bighorn sheep, Joshua trees, bobcats, yearly wildflower blooms, migratory birds, and so on. Knowing this, Cadiz, Inc. is attempting to avoid federal oversight by running its water transfer pipeline along a railroad line and using an obscure 1875 law to claim exemption from environmental review by using the railroad right-of-way.

For the most part, this article covers just a portion of the story. Some of you might already know about the Cadiz Water Project, but I think many of you do not. I only started hearing about it this year and it raised some red flags and concerns in my mind. I hope this information will spark your interest in doing further research of your own and contacting our elected officials with your thoughts and concerns.

Here are some things to think about and look into: Why is our Congressional representative supporting pumping water out of the Mojave aquifer and sending it to Orange County? Should there be concern about Department of Interior Deputy Secretary David Bernhardt’s connections with Cadiz, Inc., as the Cadiz project needs federal permits? In addition to environmental issues, will this loss from desert aquifers affect our desert community residents in the future?

State Assembly bill AB1000, introduced last July, bolsters state reviews and attempts to ensure that transfers of our desert groundwater do not adversely affect our region’s natural and cultural resources. I found our local Mojave Water Agency (MWA) opposes the bill as written, but only due to lack of clarity in some of the wording. If amended and clarified appropriately, the Agency could remove its opposition.

Again, I urge my fellow desert citizens to look into this issue, form you own opinions, and let our elected officials hear from you.

Davis Hansen is a Cal State L.A. graduate, military veteran, and former corporate executive who lives in Hesperia.

Pop star Sia tweets support for bill targeting Mojave Desert water project, calls out CA Senate leader – The Desert Sun

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Antonio Villaraigosa, former mayor of Los Angeles and 2018 California gubernatorial candidate, speaks about single payer healthcare and Cadiz Inc.’s Mojave Greater Coachella Valley Chamber of Commerce legislative luncheon. (May 12, 2017)
Richard Lui/The Desert Sun

There’s a new player in the fight over a controversial proposal to pump groundwater just outside a national monument in the Mojave Desert: pop star Sia Furler.

The best-selling singer-songwriter, who owns a home in Palm Springs and got married here a few years ago, tweeted Friday night at California Senate leader Kevin de León and another senator, urging them to “Please #preserveCA and let the CAleg vote on #AB1000.” The bill would require a state environmental review of Cadiz Inc.’s plan to pump as much as 16.3 million acres of groundwater per year in the middle of the desert, just outside Mojave Trails National Monument, and sell it to Southern California cities.

Conservation groups say the Cadiz project would threaten natural springs and wildlife in the national monument, which was created by President Barack Obama last year. The company disagrees, arguing its pumping project wouldn’t harm the environment.

The Trump administration has taken steps that could speed Cadiz’s approval, most recently may soon try to shrink the national monument, which conservationists fear could make it easier for the Cadiz project to move forward. The department’s second-in-command is David Bernhardt, who until recently worked alongside Cadiz chief executive Scott Slater at the law firm Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, which owns shares in Cadiz Inc.

READ MORE: Conservationists slam Bernhardt as ‘walking conflict of interest’

It wasn’t immediately clear how the Cadiz controversy caught the attention of Sia, who wowed crowds at the Coachella Valley Music and Art Festival last year with her trademark theatrics and hit songs like “Chandelier” and “Elastic Heart.” The singer’s publicist didn’t respond to an email seeking comment Saturday evening.

The bill Sia tweeted about, AB 1000, would require California officials to conduct an environmental review of Cadiz’s proposal, and of any other projects that would transfer groundwater away from desert lands in the vicinity of national monuments and other protected spaces. Supporters include Gov. Jerry Brown, who said the bill is needed because California’s desert landscapes “may be the most fragile ecosystems of all.”

Cadiz spokesperson Courtney Degener said Sia’s tweet “reflects a desperate attempt by the proponents of AB 1000 to use an uninformed celebrity to kill thousands of good paying union jobs, block reliable water supplies and undermine California’s stringent environmental permitting process.”

The tweet “reflects how out of touch the proponents of AB 1000 are with working California families  — those who suffer most when job opportunities lack and infrastructure improvements are endlessly delayed,” Degener said in an email.

THE CURRENT: Sign up for The Desert Sun’s energy and water newsletter

AB 1000 looked dead earlier this month after it was blocked by the Senate Appropriations Committee through a controversial procedure in which the powerful committee chairperson and legislative leaders can kill bills with no public explanation.

But the legislative session doesn’t end until this Friday, and Cadiz opponents are urging Senate leader Kevin de León — a Los Angeles Democrat who’s portrayed himself as a leader of the California resistance to President Trump — to revive the anti-Cadiz bill.

Sia’s tweet called for de León and Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens — who chairs the appropriations committee — to let the Legislature vote on the bill.

“No more fronting for Cadiz in SanBernardino!” the pop star wrote on Twitter, referring to the fact that the land the company owns is in San Bernardino County.

Sia isn’t the first celebrity to weigh in on Cadiz. 

The band Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros also Jason Ritter.

David Lamfrom, director of the National Parks Conservation Association’s California desert program, said the Cadiz issue started “getting around to progressive-minded people in LA” when the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s board voted to support AB 1000. The bill’s author, Democrat Laura Friedman, hails from Glendale.

De León hasn’t commented publicly on Cadiz, but Lara has. In a recent statement, he noted that the groundwater project has already gone through an environmental review under the California Environmental Quality Act, which survived legal challenges. The lead agency on that review was the Santa Margarita Water District in Orange County, which has a signed contract with Cadiz to buy a portion of the groundwater it pumps.

Lara said demanding an additional review would create a problematic precedent. 

“California has the highest environmental review standards in the country and this particular project has gone through significant consideration,” he said. “Making an exception for one particular case will create precedent for the Legislature to block other controversial projects.”

The anti-Cadiz bill is also opposed by dozens of water agencies, local governments, labor unions and business groups, including the Association of California Water Agencies, the Southern California Association of Governments, the California Chamber of Commerce, and the Inland Empire Economic Partnership, among others.

Cadiz is waiting for Trump’s Interior Department to review a 2015 decision that its water pipeline requires an additional federal permit, which the company contends it does not.

Sammy Roth writes about energy and the environment for The Desert Sun. He can be reached at sammy.roth@desertsun.com, (760) 778-4622 and @Sammy_Roth.