Cadiz Inc. Wants to Pump Water Out of the Mojave Desert. The … – L.A. Weekly

Then Donald Trump was elected president, and everything changed. Even before Trump was inaugurated, the Cadiz Water Conveyance Project showed up as No. 15 on a list of 50 infrastructure projects his team considered priorities.

“Literally, everyone in the water industry was like, ‘What the heck?'” says Peter H. Brooks, who owns a water technology firm. “There are thousands of critical infrastructure projects relating to water that I could link to either a public health or environmental crisis, and this doesn’t even make the top thousand. Not even close. This is a totally superfluous project that doesn’t solve any major supply need.”

This year, California Democrats have made a big show of standing up to Trump’s vision of America, from his immigration policies to the rolling back of environmental protections. “This is happening at the same time the Trump administration is undermining, in multiple ways, these long-held environmental laws,” David Lamfrom of the National Parks Conservation Association says of the Cadiz project. “Our thought was always that California wanted to stand up to these types of rollbacks.”

But Democrats are oddly divided over what to do about Cadiz, a politically well-connected company that’s been pulling strings for decades. It’s hard to believe that progressive, ambitious politicians would support a corporation over environmentalists. But then again, some pretty strange things happen out in the desert.

Keith Brackpool has been described as “a buccaneering self-made businessman,” a “politically connected wheeler-dealer” and “a British bon vivant.” He came to the United States in the 1980s, shortly after pleading guilty to criminal charges of dealing securities without a license (he paid a $3,200 fine). By the time he lost his job as head of the American division of a food company, he’d already founded Cadiz.

His vision was not unlike that of Harry Chandler and William Mulholland at the turn of the previous century: Find water. Take it.

Brackpool and his partner had seen satellite photographs of the Mojave Desert, showing that on the rare occasions when it rained, water pooled in the Cadiz Valley, indicating the ground underneath was full of water. It was this aquifer that feeds any seeps and streams that manage to flow in the Mojave. Brackpool and his company began buying up land.

In time, Cadiz would become a major fruit and vegetable grower. In 2001, the Guardian wrote, “Mr. Brackpool’s company has several agricultural schemes on the go, including one with the Saudi royal family in Egypt, which Cadiz Inc. says could become the largest single agricultural project in the world.”

Brackpool did not return phone calls requesting comment on this story.

Most of the schemes came to nothing. According to SEC filings, Cadiz has lost more than $430 million over the course of its 34-year history.

But the company’s fate was always linked to its water scheme, which in its first iteration entailed selling groundwater to the Metropolitan Water District (MWD), Southern California’s water wholesaler, which operates the Colorado River Aqueduct. Though extracting water from the desert may not seem like a brilliant money-making strategy, Cadiz is banking on the price of water going up. All it needs to do is get past a series of regulatory hurdles.

In 2000, the project experienced the first of many setbacks when the U.S. Geological Survey concluded that the rate at which the aquifer was replenishing was not, as Cadiz was claiming, 50,000 acre-feet per year (one acre-foot is roughly 325,851 gallons). It was more like 2,000 to 10,000. Since Cadiz’s original plan called for a pipeline capable of transporting up to 150,000 acre-feet of water a year, it became clear to environmentalists that if Cadiz had its way the aquifer would be emptied out rather quickly.

Cadiz has consistently disputed the USGS conclusion, which is now 17 years old.

“The recharge still happens, but it happens at such a low rate,” says hydrologist John Bredehoeft, who worked for the USGS for 32 years. “You suck it out, it’s not gonna recharge in our lifetime. The aquifer won’t be recharged in our kids’ lifetime.”

Two years after the USGS finding, the Metropolitan Water District pulled out of the Cadiz deal. Cadiz would sue the water agency for “breaching its fiduciary obligations to Cadiz and for denying Southern Californians a secure water supply at a time when consumers are being forced to pay more for less water,” according to a Cadiz press release at the time. The suit was later settled.

Throughout the 2000s, Cadiz retrenched and reformulated its plan. Instead of selling to MWD, it would sell 50,000 to 75,000 acre-feet of water to smaller water agencies, including the Santa Margarita Water District, which serves 165,000 customers in Orange County — a good 180 miles from the Cadiz Valley. And instead of building its pipeline through federal land, it would run it along a privately owned railroad right-of-way, thus avoiding federal environmental review, which would surely include the USGS’ findings.

Cadiz’s defenders — including labor unions, business organizations and politicians such as Congressman Tony Cardenas and former mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (who’s now running for governor) — use variations of the same argument: The project has already passed the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review, perhaps the toughest environmental review process in the country. If it’s good enough for CEQA, why add another layer of oversight?

“The project has now gone through over two decades of environmental and regulatory review,” said Villaraigosa campaign spokesman Luis Vizcaino in a statement. “It has more than balanced the need to protect our environment, promote high-wage jobs and supply water to Southern California for the next drought.”

Opponents of the project point out that the lead agency for Cadiz’s CEQA process is the Santa Margarita Water District, the agency that stands to benefit the most from a new source of water (it currently gets its water from the MWD; some speculate that Santa Margarita sees the deal as a hedge against future rate increases).

Not only does Santa Margarita benefit but the potentially negative effects of the project will be most apparent 180 miles away, in the desert.

Since the 1990s, Cadiz Inc. has existed almost entirely in pursuit of a single objective: Pump water out of the Fenner Basin.

“The public that’s being impacted isn’t connected to the lead agency,” Prabhala says. “That goes against the core principals of CEQA.”

Santa Margarita spokesman Jim Leech dismisses this criticism, saying, “We had public hearings here in Santa Margarita and in the Inland Empire, out where the project is. Joshua Tree comes to mind. We went as far and wide as we could to vet this thing. There was the allegation that perhaps we weren’t the right agency, but courts completely did not agree with that.”

There were always those who doubted the project would get built. There were simply too many roadblocks. Cadiz’s water has naturally occurring Chromium-6, a dangerous carcinogen. Its water, then, will most likely have to be treated before it can slip into the region’s main water supply.

“I have been told that there are Chromium-6 issues with that groundwater, and that’s a big deal with my agency,” says MWD board chairman Randy Record.

The project’s biggest obstacle, however, has long been U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein. While Cadiz has been able to ingratiate itself with former governors Gray Davis (Brackpool was both a fundraiser and an adviser to him) and Arnold Schwarzenegger (his chief of staff was a consultant for Cadiz), and with Villaraigosa (not one but two stints as a Cadiz consultant), the 84-year-old senator has been immune to the company’s charms.

Feinstein is not exactly known as a champion of the environment, but she has considered the protection of the Mojave Desert part of her legacy. Ever since the USGS finding, she has bitterly opposed the project, for years adding a rider into the federal budget forbidding the U.S. Department of the Interior from spending any money on it.

In 2015, the Bureau of Land Management, under President Obama, ruled that Cadiz couldn’t use the railroad right-of-way for its pipeline. Upon news of the decision, Cadiz’s stock dropped from $7.90 to $3 a share. Scott Slater, a prominent water attorney who’d been appointed Cadiz CEO in 2011, vowed to press on.

“They’re very shrewd, and they have a tremendous amount of money,” Lamfrom says. “But no one has bought into what they are selling until Donald Trump got elected.”

In the days following Nov. 8, as the phrase “President-elect Donald Trump” sunk in, Cadiz stock climbed from the doldrums into the double digits. Traders suspected that Trump might revive the project, and they were right.

A diagram, from Cadiz Inc., showing how water seeps into the ground, and how Cadiz plans to take it out

In April, Trump nominated David Bernhardt as deputy secretary for the Department of Interior. Bernhardt was a partner at Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, a lobbying firm where Cadiz CEO Scott Slater also works. The Brownstein/Cadiz connection runs deep: Cadiz has paid more than $2.75 million in lobbying fees and issued 200,000 shares to Brownstein. And the firm stands to get 200,000 additional shares should the Cadiz water project get built, according to an SEC filing last year.

During his confirmation hearing, Bernhardt said: “I had no involvement on the Cadiz matter.” And in a letter, he said he would “withdraw” from his Brownstein partnership and promised to recuse himself from any matters relating to Brownstein clients for one year.

“To expect that he has cut ties with that lobbying firm and no longer has relationships there doesn’t fit with the facts,” says Frazier Haney, the conservation director at the Mojave Desert Land Trust.

Brownstein reps did not respond to requests for comment.

On Oct. 16, the Bureau of Land Management, now under President Trump, reversed its earlier decision and gave Cadiz permission to build its pipeline along the railroad right-of-way, allowing it to avoid federal review.

Feinstein tried to get the California State Legislature to pass a bill adding another layer of state-level environmental review to the project. But AB 1000, authored by Assembly member Laura Friedman, was opposed by a powerful force in Sacramento: trade unions, who say the project will create jobs. That gave two notable Cadiz supporters — state Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León and Senate appropriations chairman Ricardo Lara — all the cover they needed to place the bill in the “suspense file,” preventing a vote in the Senate.

“It wasn’t even allowed to go in front of the committee, which is really unfortunate,” Friedman says. “I have no idea why. No one has given me an explanation.”

In a written statement, Lara said, “This particular project has gone through significant consideration and CEQA litigation. … Making an exception for one particular case will create precedent for the Legislature to block other controversial projects.”

De León, through spokesman Anthony Reyes, says he stands by Lara.

Why are ambitious elected officials like Lara, who’s running for insurance commissioner in 2018, and de León, who’s challenging Feinstein for her Senate seat, effectively siding with the Trump administration on a project environmentalists loathe?

Some Cadiz opponents point to the company’s prodigious campaign contributions — more than half a million dollars to various statewide candidates and ballot measures since 2005, including $9,000 to de León and $60,000 to Villaraigosa. Brackpool has given another $29,000 to Villaraigosa’s gubernatorial campaign.

Others point to Cadiz’s connections. To help defeat AB 1000, Cadiz turned to the lobbying firm Mercury Public Affairs. Both De León and Lara got their starts working for Fabian Nuñez, a partner at Mercury.

“Kevin de León and Ricardo Lara have been the face of resistance against Trump in California,” says Lamfrom, “and we are perplexed as to why they are opposing the bill.”

Though the Cadiz project has the Trump administration’s nod of approval, it is far from a sure thing. It still needs permits, as well as an agreement with the MWD. And the California Lands Commission recently discovered that the proposed pipeline would cross a small strip of state-owned land, which means Cadiz would have to lease the land from the commission — a three-member body that includes Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, who has expressed opposition to the project.

And Cadiz still needs to treat the water for Chromium-6. Some have even wondered if, in the end, the whole scheme will pencil out.

“I think when agencies see how expensive the water is, they may not even want it,” Lamfrom says.

Critics see the Cadiz project, along with proposals for desalinization plants, as part of a newer trend: the privatization of natural resources. They also see it as a throwback, a retrograde, supply-side solution to the coming water shortage.

“We’re talking about 50,000 acre-feet a year,” Lamfrom says. “That same amount could be saved through water recycling, moving to more aggressive conservation methods. It wouldn’t be hard for us to find those types of water savings, instead of exploiting the California desert.”

On the other hand, water is like oil — the scarcer it is, the more valuable it will be. Are Californians really willing to leave it in the ground forever?

“It’s important that we look at all potential supplies,” says MWD chairman Record, “and that we also look at how we manage demand.”

As far as the Cadiz water project goes, he doesn’t want to comment on it until he sees the details, but allows: “It’s been on and off for a long time. It’s an interesting idea.”

A Controversial Plan to Drain Water From the Desert? Go for It, Trump Administration Says – L.A. Weekly

Then Donald Trump was elected president, and everything changed. Even before Trump was inaugurated, the Cadiz Water Conveyance Project showed up as No. 15 on a list of 50 infrastructure projects his team considered priorities.

“Literally, everyone in the water industry was like, ‘What the heck?'” says Peter H. Brooks, who owns a water technology firm. “There are thousands of critical infrastructure projects relating to water that I could link to either a public health or environmental crisis, and this doesn’t even make the top thousand. Not even close. This is a totally superfluous project that doesn’t solve any major supply need.”

This year, California Democrats have made a big show of standing up to Trump’s vision of America, from his immigration policies to the rolling back of environmental protections. “This is happening at the same time the Trump administration is undermining, in multiple ways, these long-held environmental laws,” David Lamfrom of the National Parks Conservation Association says of the Cadiz project. “Our thought was always that California wanted to stand up to these types of rollbacks.”

But Democrats are oddly divided over what to do about Cadiz, a politically well-connected company that’s been pulling strings for decades. It’s hard to believe that progressive, ambitious politicians would support a corporation over environmentalists. But then again, some pretty strange things happen out in the desert.

Keith Brackpool has been described as “a buccaneering self-made businessman,” a “politically connected wheeler-dealer” and “a British bon vivant.” He came to the United States in the 1980s, shortly after pleading guilty to criminal charges of dealing securities without a license (he paid a $3,200 fine). By the time he lost his job as head of the American division of a food company, he’d already founded Cadiz.

His vision was not unlike that of Harry Chandler and William Mulholland at the turn of the previous century: Find water. Take it.

Brackpool and his partner had seen satellite photographs of the Mojave Desert, showing that on the rare occasions when it rained, water pooled in the Cadiz Valley, indicating the ground underneath was full of water. It was this aquifer that feeds any seeps and streams that manage to flow in the Mojave. Brackpool and his company began buying up land.

In time, Cadiz would become a major fruit and vegetable grower. In 2001, the Guardian wrote, “Mr. Brackpool’s company has several agricultural schemes on the go, including one with the Saudi royal family in Egypt, which Cadiz Inc. says could become the largest single agricultural project in the world.”

Brackpool did not return phone calls requesting comment on this story.

Most of the schemes came to nothing. According to SEC filings, Cadiz has lost more than $430 million over the course of its 34-year history.

But the company’s fate was always linked to its water scheme, which in its first iteration entailed selling groundwater to the Metropolitan Water District (MWD), Southern California’s water wholesaler, which operates the Colorado River Aqueduct. Though extracting water from the desert may not seem like a brilliant money-making strategy, Cadiz is banking on the price of water going up. All it needs to do is get past a series of regulatory hurdles.

In 2000, the project experienced the first of many setbacks when the U.S. Geological Survey concluded that the rate at which the aquifer was replenishing was not, as Cadiz was claiming, 50,000 acre-feet per year (one acre-foot is roughly 325,851 gallons). It was more like 2,000 to 10,000. Since Cadiz’s original plan called for a pipeline capable of transporting up to 150,000 acre-feet of water a year, it became clear to environmentalists that if Cadiz had its way the aquifer would be emptied out rather quickly.

Cadiz has consistently disputed the USGS conclusion, which is now 17 years old.

“The recharge still happens, but it happens at such a low rate,” says hydrologist John Bredehoeft, who worked for the USGS for 32 years. “You suck it out, it’s not gonna recharge in our lifetime. The aquifer won’t be recharged in our kids’ lifetime.”

Two years after the USGS finding, the Metropolitan Water District pulled out of the Cadiz deal. Cadiz would sue the water agency for “breaching its fiduciary obligations to Cadiz and for denying Southern Californians a secure water supply at a time when consumers are being forced to pay more for less water,” according to a Cadiz press release at the time. The suit was later settled.

Throughout the 2000s, Cadiz retrenched and reformulated its plan. Instead of selling to MWD, it would sell 50,000 to 75,000 acre-feet of water to smaller water agencies, including the Santa Margarita Water District, which serves 165,000 customers in Orange County — a good 180 miles from the Cadiz Valley. And instead of building its pipeline through federal land, it would run it along a privately owned railroad right-of-way, thus avoiding federal environmental review, which would surely include the USGS’ findings.

Cadiz’s defenders — including labor unions, business organizations and politicians such as Congressman Tony Cardenas and former mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (who’s now running for governor) — use variations of the same argument: The project has already passed the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review, perhaps the toughest environmental review process in the country. If it’s good enough for CEQA, why add another layer of oversight?

“The project has now gone through over two decades of environmental and regulatory review,” said Villaraigosa campaign spokesman Luis Vizcaino in a statement. “It has more than balanced the need to protect our environment, promote high-wage jobs and supply water to Southern California for the next drought.”

Opponents of the project point out that the lead agency for Cadiz’s CEQA process is the Santa Margarita Water District, the agency that stands to benefit the most from a new source of water (it currently gets its water from the MWD; some speculate that Santa Margarita sees the deal as a hedge against future rate increases).

Not only does Santa Margarita benefit but the potentially negative effects of the project will be most apparent 180 miles away, in the desert.

Since the 1990s, Cadiz Inc. has existed almost entirely in pursuit of a single objective: Pump water out of the Fenner Basin.

“The public that’s being impacted isn’t connected to the lead agency,” Prabhala says. “That goes against the core principals of CEQA.”

Santa Margarita spokesman Jim Leech dismisses this criticism, saying, “We had public hearings here in Santa Margarita and in the Inland Empire, out where the project is. Joshua Tree comes to mind. We went as far and wide as we could to vet this thing. There was the allegation that perhaps we weren’t the right agency, but courts completely did not agree with that.”

There were always those who doubted the project would get built. There were simply too many roadblocks. Cadiz’s water has naturally occurring Chromium-6, a dangerous carcinogen. Its water, then, will most likely have to be treated before it can slip into the region’s main water supply.

“I have been told that there are Chromium-6 issues with that groundwater, and that’s a big deal with my agency,” says MWD board chairman Randy Record.

The project’s biggest obstacle, however, has long been U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein. While Cadiz has been able to ingratiate itself with former governors Gray Davis (Brackpool was both a fundraiser and an adviser to him) and Arnold Schwarzenegger (his chief of staff was a consultant for Cadiz), and with Villaraigosa (not one but two stints as a Cadiz consultant), the 84-year-old senator has been immune to the company’s charms.

Feinstein is not exactly known as a champion of the environment, but she has considered the protection of the Mojave Desert part of her legacy. Ever since the USGS finding, she has bitterly opposed the project, for years adding a rider into the federal budget forbidding the U.S. Department of the Interior from spending any money on it.

In 2015, the Bureau of Land Management, under President Obama, ruled that Cadiz couldn’t use the railroad right-of-way for its pipeline. Upon news of the decision, Cadiz’s stock dropped from $7.90 to $3 a share. Scott Slater, a prominent water attorney who’d been appointed Cadiz CEO in 2011, vowed to press on.

“They’re very shrewd, and they have a tremendous amount of money,” Lamfrom says. “But no one has bought into what they are selling until Donald Trump got elected.”

In the days following Nov. 8, as the phrase “President-elect Donald Trump” sunk in, Cadiz stock climbed from the doldrums into the double digits. Traders suspected that Trump might revive the project, and they were right.

A diagram, from Cadiz Inc., showing how water seeps into the ground, and how Cadiz plans to take it out

In April, Trump nominated David Bernhardt as deputy secretary for the Department of Interior. Bernhardt was a partner at Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, a lobbying firm where Cadiz CEO Scott Slater also works. The Brownstein/Cadiz connection runs deep: Cadiz has paid more than $2.75 million in lobbying fees and issued 200,000 shares to Brownstein. And the firm stands to get 200,000 additional shares should the Cadiz water project get built, according to an SEC filing last year.

During his confirmation hearing, Bernhardt said: “I had no involvement on the Cadiz matter.” And in a letter, he said he would “withdraw” from his Brownstein partnership and promised to recuse himself from any matters relating to Brownstein clients for one year.

“To expect that he has cut ties with that lobbying firm and no longer has relationships there doesn’t fit with the facts,” says Frazier Haney, the conservation director at the Mojave Desert Land Trust.

Brownstein reps did not respond to requests for comment.

On Oct. 16, the Bureau of Land Management, now under President Trump, reversed its earlier decision and gave Cadiz permission to build its pipeline along the railroad right-of-way, allowing it to avoid federal review.

Feinstein tried to get the California State Legislature to pass a bill adding another layer of state-level environmental review to the project. But AB 1000, authored by Assembly member Laura Friedman, was opposed by a powerful force in Sacramento: trade unions, who say the project will create jobs. That gave two notable Cadiz supporters — state Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de León and Senate appropriations chairman Ricardo Lara — all the cover they needed to place the bill in the “suspense file,” preventing a vote in the Senate.

“It wasn’t even allowed to go in front of the committee, which is really unfortunate,” Friedman says. “I have no idea why. No one has given me an explanation.”

In a written statement, Lara said, “This particular project has gone through significant consideration and CEQA litigation. … Making an exception for one particular case will create precedent for the Legislature to block other controversial projects.”

De León, through spokesman Anthony Reyes, says he stands by Lara.

Why are ambitious elected officials like Lara, who’s running for insurance commissioner in 2018, and de León, who’s challenging Feinstein for her Senate seat, effectively siding with the Trump administration on a project environmentalists loathe?

Some Cadiz opponents point to the company’s prodigious campaign contributions — more than half a million dollars to various statewide candidates and ballot measures since 2005, including $9,000 to de León and $60,000 to Villaraigosa. Brackpool has given another $29,000 to Villaraigosa’s gubernatorial campaign.

Others point to Cadiz’s connections. To help defeat AB 1000, Cadiz turned to the lobbying firm Mercury Public Affairs. Both De León and Lara got their starts working for Fabian Nuñez, a partner at Mercury.

“Kevin de León and Ricardo Lara have been the face of resistance against Trump in California,” says Lamfrom, “and we are perplexed as to why they are opposing the bill.”

Though the Cadiz project has the Trump administration’s nod of approval, it is far from a sure thing. It still needs permits, as well as an agreement with the MWD. And the California Lands Commission recently discovered that the proposed pipeline would cross a small strip of state-owned land, which means Cadiz would have to lease the land from the commission — a three-member body that includes Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, who has expressed opposition to the project.

And Cadiz still needs to treat the water for Chromium-6. Some have even wondered if, in the end, the whole scheme will pencil out.

“I think when agencies see how expensive the water is, they may not even want it,” Lamfrom says.

Critics see the Cadiz project, along with proposals for desalinization plants, as part of a newer trend: the privatization of natural resources. They also see it as a throwback, a retrograde, supply-side solution to the coming water shortage.

“We’re talking about 50,000 acre-feet a year,” Lamfrom says. “That same amount could be saved through water recycling, moving to more aggressive conservation methods. It wouldn’t be hard for us to find those types of water savings, instead of exploiting the California desert.”

On the other hand, water is like oil — the scarcer it is, the more valuable it will be. Are Californians really willing to leave it in the ground forever?

“It’s important that we look at all potential supplies,” says MWD chairman Record, “and that we also look at how we manage demand.”

As far as the Cadiz water project goes, he doesn’t want to comment on it until he sees the details, but allows: “It’s been on and off for a long time. It’s an interesting idea.”

Cadiz time capsule topic for woman’s club – The Daily Times

Guest speaker Michael Thomas, manager of Walk Life, will offer insight on the area’s drug problem and what’s being done about it.

But history took priority at the club’s October meeting when the program topic focused on the discovery of a 1924 time capsule and its contents found in Cadiz in October 2015.

Guest speakers Sue Adams, president of the Harrison County Genealogical Society, and Carole Spiker of the Harrison County Historical Society brought several items from the time capsule and presented a Power Point of photos to share the story of how it was discovered accidentally through old pictures of the former Custer Hotel and Theater at Main and Market streets in Cadiz.

As that building neared demolition, an effort to focus on its history specifically and the block in which it stood in general produced a photo that was the catalyst for retrieving the time capsule, an 8-by-8-by-15-inch copper box soldered shut and despite being small was nonetheless heavy and “jam packed with items.”

The photo was of a woman on a ladder placing the time capsule in the wall, a woman identified as Ida Mae Smith. Near her was her father, E.M. Long, who built the hotel that opened in 1925. The festivities drew quite a crowd during a period in history of prosperity, they noted.

“He built all over Harrison County and part of Jefferson County,” Adams said of the man whose motto was “True greatness is to serve.”

“When we found out they had buried a time capsule, we were quite anxious to get in and save it because had we not known, it would have been in the dust and debris,” Spiker said, noting Chris Clark Miller, Long’s great-granddaughter, had the honor of extracting the time capsule.

Spiker said she was so excited to learn about the time capsule, she called the Ohio Historical Society and spoke with a man in the archives department for advice on how to proceed.

His response? Wear protective gloves since the contents might not be in good shape and falling apart and don’t be disappointed if there’s little in the box.

About 25 people gathered for the time capsule’s opening, the contents of which had been protected by Merino wool that Harrison County was famous for. Merino sheep constituted the county’s main industry prior to coal.

“We’re forever thankful to whoever decided what went in there. It was an exciting evening, and we were glad the historical director was wrong when he said we wouldn’t find things, because we found treasures,” Spiker said.

Everything in the time capsule was in pristine condition save a lump of coal from the Short Creek Coal Co., which “just kind of fell apart.”

The contents included copies of the Cadiz Republican, the Freeport Press and the Democrat Sentinel, each of which carried a list of contents; records of who held county offices from 1813-1924; a roster of the Cadiz Band, the town band and originator of the idea for the time capsule as a way to honor Long for all he had done for the community and all the buildings he had built, including the Harrison County Courthouse; a railroad token; a pack of Lucky Strikes cigarettes; information on all the churches; and a Cadiz directory that offered a glimpse via advertisements of businesses.

An interesting find concerned information on African-American organizations in town, including a Masonic lodge and Eastern Star order. There also was information on William H. Lucas who was “born a free black man in Virginia, and his parents brought him to Cadiz as a 6-year-old, knowing he would be educated,” Adams said of Lucas, who was born in 1850. “He was the first black man to graduate from Cadiz High School,” Adams said, noting he was elected clerk of Cadiz in 1882 and held that position for 60 consecutive years. “He was re-elected 29 times, and he is in ‘Ripley’s Believe It or Not,’” she said.

The time capsule also included a piece of gutter as E.M. Long and Sons made gutters and were famous all over the country for them; pictures of Long and his family; and a list of all the teachers for the 1924-25 school year in Harrison County.

“Back at this time there were 191 schools in Harrison County,” Adams said. “A lot of these were one-room schools, and there were 178 teachers — 46 men and 132 women.”

President Iris Craig presided at the meeting where Carlotta Jordan, membership chair, inducted Trudy Wilson as a new member.

On behalf of the club, Craig presented a check for $1,000 to guests Lts. Erik and Barri Vazquez-Muhs of the Salvation Army of Steubenville. The money will aid hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

Marge Bedortha and Eleanor Weiss served as hostesses.

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Cadiz time capsule topic for woman’s club – The Daily Times

Guest speaker Michael Thomas, manager of Walk Life, will offer insight on the area’s drug problem and what’s being done about it.

But history took priority at the club’s October meeting when the program topic focused on the discovery of a 1924 time capsule and its contents found in Cadiz in October 2015.

Guest speakers Sue Adams, president of the Harrison County Genealogical Society, and Carole Spiker of the Harrison County Historical Society brought several items from the time capsule and presented a Power Point of photos to share the story of how it was discovered accidentally through old pictures of the former Custer Hotel and Theater at Main and Market streets in Cadiz.

As that building neared demolition, an effort to focus on its history specifically and the block in which it stood in general produced a photo that was the catalyst for retrieving the time capsule, an 8-by-8-by-15-inch copper box soldered shut and despite being small was nonetheless heavy and “jam packed with items.”

The photo was of a woman on a ladder placing the time capsule in the wall, a woman identified as Ida Mae Smith. Near her was her father, E.M. Long, who built the hotel that opened in 1925. The festivities drew quite a crowd during a period in history of prosperity, they noted.

“He built all over Harrison County and part of Jefferson County,” Adams said of the man whose motto was “True greatness is to serve.”

“When we found out they had buried a time capsule, we were quite anxious to get in and save it because had we not known, it would have been in the dust and debris,” Spiker said, noting Chris Clark Miller, Long’s great-granddaughter, had the honor of extracting the time capsule.

Spiker said she was so excited to learn about the time capsule, she called the Ohio Historical Society and spoke with a man in the archives department for advice on how to proceed.

His response? Wear protective gloves since the contents might not be in good shape and falling apart and don’t be disappointed if there’s little in the box.

About 25 people gathered for the time capsule’s opening, the contents of which had been protected by Merino wool that Harrison County was famous for. Merino sheep constituted the county’s main industry prior to coal.

“We’re forever thankful to whoever decided what went in there. It was an exciting evening, and we were glad the historical director was wrong when he said we wouldn’t find things, because we found treasures,” Spiker said.

Everything in the time capsule was in pristine condition save a lump of coal from the Short Creek Coal Co., which “just kind of fell apart.”

The contents included copies of the Cadiz Republican, the Freeport Press and the Democrat Sentinel, each of which carried a list of contents; records of who held county offices from 1813-1924; a roster of the Cadiz Band, the town band and originator of the idea for the time capsule as a way to honor Long for all he had done for the community and all the buildings he had built, including the Harrison County Courthouse; a railroad token; a pack of Lucky Strikes cigarettes; information on all the churches; and a Cadiz directory that offered a glimpse via advertisements of businesses.

An interesting find concerned information on African-American organizations in town, including a Masonic lodge and Eastern Star order. There also was information on William H. Lucas who was “born a free black man in Virginia, and his parents brought him to Cadiz as a 6-year-old, knowing he would be educated,” Adams said of Lucas, who was born in 1850. “He was the first black man to graduate from Cadiz High School,” Adams said, noting he was elected clerk of Cadiz in 1882 and held that position for 60 consecutive years. “He was re-elected 29 times, and he is in ‘Ripley’s Believe It or Not,’” she said.

The time capsule also included a piece of gutter as E.M. Long and Sons made gutters and were famous all over the country for them; pictures of Long and his family; and a list of all the teachers for the 1924-25 school year in Harrison County.

“Back at this time there were 191 schools in Harrison County,” Adams said. “A lot of these were one-room schools, and there were 178 teachers — 46 men and 132 women.”

President Iris Craig presided at the meeting where Carlotta Jordan, membership chair, inducted Trudy Wilson as a new member.

On behalf of the club, Craig presented a check for $1,000 to guests Lts. Erik and Barri Vazquez-Muhs of the Salvation Army of Steubenville. The money will aid hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

Marge Bedortha and Eleanor Weiss served as hostesses.

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Cadiz time capsule topic for woman’s club – The Daily Times

Guest speaker Michael Thomas, manager of Walk Life, will offer insight on the area’s drug problem and what’s being done about it.

But history took priority at the club’s October meeting when the program topic focused on the discovery of a 1924 time capsule and its contents found in Cadiz in October 2015.

Guest speakers Sue Adams, president of the Harrison County Genealogical Society, and Carole Spiker of the Harrison County Historical Society brought several items from the time capsule and presented a Power Point of photos to share the story of how it was discovered accidentally through old pictures of the former Custer Hotel and Theater at Main and Market streets in Cadiz.

As that building neared demolition, an effort to focus on its history specifically and the block in which it stood in general produced a photo that was the catalyst for retrieving the time capsule, an 8-by-8-by-15-inch copper box soldered shut and despite being small was nonetheless heavy and “jam packed with items.”

The photo was of a woman on a ladder placing the time capsule in the wall, a woman identified as Ida Mae Smith. Near her was her father, E.M. Long, who built the hotel that opened in 1925. The festivities drew quite a crowd during a period in history of prosperity, they noted.

“He built all over Harrison County and part of Jefferson County,” Adams said of the man whose motto was “True greatness is to serve.”

“When we found out they had buried a time capsule, we were quite anxious to get in and save it because had we not known, it would have been in the dust and debris,” Spiker said, noting Chris Clark Miller, Long’s great-granddaughter, had the honor of extracting the time capsule.

Spiker said she was so excited to learn about the time capsule, she called the Ohio Historical Society and spoke with a man in the archives department for advice on how to proceed.

His response? Wear protective gloves since the contents might not be in good shape and falling apart and don’t be disappointed if there’s little in the box.

About 25 people gathered for the time capsule’s opening, the contents of which had been protected by Merino wool that Harrison County was famous for. Merino sheep constituted the county’s main industry prior to coal.

“We’re forever thankful to whoever decided what went in there. It was an exciting evening, and we were glad the historical director was wrong when he said we wouldn’t find things, because we found treasures,” Spiker said.

Everything in the time capsule was in pristine condition save a lump of coal from the Short Creek Coal Co., which “just kind of fell apart.”

The contents included copies of the Cadiz Republican, the Freeport Press and the Democrat Sentinel, each of which carried a list of contents; records of who held county offices from 1813-1924; a roster of the Cadiz Band, the town band and originator of the idea for the time capsule as a way to honor Long for all he had done for the community and all the buildings he had built, including the Harrison County Courthouse; a railroad token; a pack of Lucky Strikes cigarettes; information on all the churches; and a Cadiz directory that offered a glimpse via advertisements of businesses.

An interesting find concerned information on African-American organizations in town, including a Masonic lodge and Eastern Star order. There also was information on William H. Lucas who was “born a free black man in Virginia, and his parents brought him to Cadiz as a 6-year-old, knowing he would be educated,” Adams said of Lucas, who was born in 1850. “He was the first black man to graduate from Cadiz High School,” Adams said, noting he was elected clerk of Cadiz in 1882 and held that position for 60 consecutive years. “He was re-elected 29 times, and he is in ‘Ripley’s Believe It or Not,’” she said.

The time capsule also included a piece of gutter as E.M. Long and Sons made gutters and were famous all over the country for them; pictures of Long and his family; and a list of all the teachers for the 1924-25 school year in Harrison County.

“Back at this time there were 191 schools in Harrison County,” Adams said. “A lot of these were one-room schools, and there were 178 teachers — 46 men and 132 women.”

President Iris Craig presided at the meeting where Carlotta Jordan, membership chair, inducted Trudy Wilson as a new member.

On behalf of the club, Craig presented a check for $1,000 to guests Lts. Erik and Barri Vazquez-Muhs of the Salvation Army of Steubenville. The money will aid hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

Marge Bedortha and Eleanor Weiss served as hostesses.

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Cadiz time capsule topic for woman’s club – The Daily Times

Guest speaker Michael Thomas, manager of Walk Life, will offer insight on the area’s drug problem and what’s being done about it.

But history took priority at the club’s October meeting when the program topic focused on the discovery of a 1924 time capsule and its contents found in Cadiz in October 2015.

Guest speakers Sue Adams, president of the Harrison County Genealogical Society, and Carole Spiker of the Harrison County Historical Society brought several items from the time capsule and presented a Power Point of photos to share the story of how it was discovered accidentally through old pictures of the former Custer Hotel and Theater at Main and Market streets in Cadiz.

As that building neared demolition, an effort to focus on its history specifically and the block in which it stood in general produced a photo that was the catalyst for retrieving the time capsule, an 8-by-8-by-15-inch copper box soldered shut and despite being small was nonetheless heavy and “jam packed with items.”

The photo was of a woman on a ladder placing the time capsule in the wall, a woman identified as Ida Mae Smith. Near her was her father, E.M. Long, who built the hotel that opened in 1925. The festivities drew quite a crowd during a period in history of prosperity, they noted.

“He built all over Harrison County and part of Jefferson County,” Adams said of the man whose motto was “True greatness is to serve.”

“When we found out they had buried a time capsule, we were quite anxious to get in and save it because had we not known, it would have been in the dust and debris,” Spiker said, noting Chris Clark Miller, Long’s great-granddaughter, had the honor of extracting the time capsule.

Spiker said she was so excited to learn about the time capsule, she called the Ohio Historical Society and spoke with a man in the archives department for advice on how to proceed.

His response? Wear protective gloves since the contents might not be in good shape and falling apart and don’t be disappointed if there’s little in the box.

About 25 people gathered for the time capsule’s opening, the contents of which had been protected by Merino wool that Harrison County was famous for. Merino sheep constituted the county’s main industry prior to coal.

“We’re forever thankful to whoever decided what went in there. It was an exciting evening, and we were glad the historical director was wrong when he said we wouldn’t find things, because we found treasures,” Spiker said.

Everything in the time capsule was in pristine condition save a lump of coal from the Short Creek Coal Co., which “just kind of fell apart.”

The contents included copies of the Cadiz Republican, the Freeport Press and the Democrat Sentinel, each of which carried a list of contents; records of who held county offices from 1813-1924; a roster of the Cadiz Band, the town band and originator of the idea for the time capsule as a way to honor Long for all he had done for the community and all the buildings he had built, including the Harrison County Courthouse; a railroad token; a pack of Lucky Strikes cigarettes; information on all the churches; and a Cadiz directory that offered a glimpse via advertisements of businesses.

An interesting find concerned information on African-American organizations in town, including a Masonic lodge and Eastern Star order. There also was information on William H. Lucas who was “born a free black man in Virginia, and his parents brought him to Cadiz as a 6-year-old, knowing he would be educated,” Adams said of Lucas, who was born in 1850. “He was the first black man to graduate from Cadiz High School,” Adams said, noting he was elected clerk of Cadiz in 1882 and held that position for 60 consecutive years. “He was re-elected 29 times, and he is in ‘Ripley’s Believe It or Not,’” she said.

The time capsule also included a piece of gutter as E.M. Long and Sons made gutters and were famous all over the country for them; pictures of Long and his family; and a list of all the teachers for the 1924-25 school year in Harrison County.

“Back at this time there were 191 schools in Harrison County,” Adams said. “A lot of these were one-room schools, and there were 178 teachers — 46 men and 132 women.”

President Iris Craig presided at the meeting where Carlotta Jordan, membership chair, inducted Trudy Wilson as a new member.

On behalf of the club, Craig presented a check for $1,000 to guests Lts. Erik and Barri Vazquez-Muhs of the Salvation Army of Steubenville. The money will aid hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

Marge Bedortha and Eleanor Weiss served as hostesses.

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Standard Lithium Signs MoU to Expand California Project With Permitted Brine Producer in Bristol Dry Lake, Adds … – GlobeNewswire (press release)

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, Oct. 30, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Standard Lithium Ltd. (“Standard Lithium” or the “Company”) (TSX-V:SLL) (FRA:S5L) (OTCQX:STLHF) is pleased to announce that it has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (“MoU”), with TETRA Technologies, Inc., a NYSE-listed company (“TETRA”) to secure access to additional operating and permitted land consisting of approximately 12,100 acres in Bristol Dry Lake, and up to 11,840 acres in the adjacent Cadiz Dry Lake, Mojave Desert, California.  As a result, the Company now has access to approximately 48,000 acres of mixed private, patented and placer claim land in the Bristol Dry Lake and Cadiz Dry Lake basins that allows for exclusive lithium brine exploration and processing.  The new MoU with TETRA allows for the exclusive right to negotiate and conduct exploration activities and to enter into a mineral lease to allow exploration and production activities for lithium extraction on property held under longstanding mining claims and permits by TETRA (transaction terms described below). In connection with the entering into of the MoU, and in support of the transaction with TETRA, the Company has made a non-refundable deposit of US$100,000.

Standard Lithium CEO, Robert Mintak said, “Since day one we have recognized the bigger opportunity with respect to expanding the resource base and strengthening project economics at Bristol Dry Lake by securing the rights for lithium development over the entire basin.  By inking an agreement with TETRA, the only other permitted operator in the area, we have now effectively achieved that.  This is a significant and strategic move for Standard, but has only been made possible by the excellent relationships we have developed with the permitted brine operators in the region.  Gaining access to the adjacent Cadiz Dry Lake operating project is an additional benefit to our relationship with TETRA.”

TETRA currently operates two passive solar evaporation plants in the Mojave Desert area of San Bernardino County, California, which produce liquid calcium chloride from underground brine reserves that are pumped to the surface.  The Bristol Dry Lake project is currently permitted for brine extraction and processing activities, has significant production infrastructure in place and is serviced by major highways, power and a dedicated rail siding and loading spur.  The Cadiz Dry Lake Property is located approximately 20 km southeast of the Bristol Dry Lake Property and brings the Company’s total project opportunity in the Mojave Desert to approximately 48,000 acres.

Dr. Andy Robinson, President and COO of Standard Lithium said, “Three initial grab samples of brine from wells at Cadiz show lithium concentrations in pumped brine ranging between 112 to 139 mg/L.  These concentrations from relatively shallow wells suggests that there is a potentially significant lithium brine deposit present in the Cadiz Dry Lake basin.  Our technical team is currently performing due-diligence on all available data for the Cadiz Dry Lake basin and will be laying out a plan for new data collection over the coming months.  Additional investigation of  TETRA’s properties in both Bristol Dry Lake and Cadiz Dry Lake will be performed concurrently with our existing resource definition program, and as such, we should be able to significantly expand our resource base as we move towards producing maiden lithium resource estimates for the Mojave projects.”

Transaction Terms – Option Agreement

Under the terms of the MoU, the parties have agree to negotiate a definitive option agreement (the “Option Agreement”) which will provide Standard Lithium with a period of six (6) years to conduct brine exploration activities (the “Option Period”) on the Bristol Dry Lake Property and/or the Cadiz Dry Lake Property.  If during the Option Period, Standard Lithium elects to conduct exploration activities on both Properties, the Company will be required to make a series of cash payments and share issuances to TETRA which will be set forth in the Option Agreement.  Any such payments or share issuances will be adjusted in the event the Option Agreement includes only one of the Properties.

Lease Agreement & Royalty

In accordance with the terms of the MoU, at any time during the Option Period, Standard Lithium has the right to exercise the Option, following which the Company and TETRA would negotiate and enter into a lease granting Standard Lithium a period of thirty (30) years of commercial production of lithium from brine produced by the Properties and subject to an annual royalty on the gross revenue derived by Standard Lithium from the sale of lithium resulting from the brine produced from the Properties.

Definitive Documentation

Standard Lithium’s right to conduct exploration activities on the Properties remains subject to the negotiation and finalization of a definitive Option Agreement.  Any share issuances contemplated by such an Option Agreement will be subject to the approval of the TSX Venture Exchange and would be subject to statutory restrictions on resale.

Quality Assurance

Raymond Spanjers, Certified Professional Geologist (SME No. 3041730), is a qualified person as defined by NI 43-101, and has supervised the preparation of the scientific and technical information that forms the basis for this news release.  Mr. Spanjers is not independent of the Company as he is an officer in his role as Vice President, Exploration and Development.

About Standard Lithium

Standard’s value creation strategy encompasses acquiring a diverse and highly prospective portfolio of large-scale domestic brine resources, led by an innovative and results-oriented management team with a strong focus on technical skills.  The Company is currently focused on the immediate exploration and development of the Bristol Dry Lake Lithium Project located in the Mojave region of San Bernardino County, California; the location has significant infrastructure in-place, with easy road and rail access, abundant electricity and water sources, and is already permitted for extensive brine extraction and processing activities.  The Company is also commencing resource evaluation on 33,000 acres of brine leases located in the Smackover Formation.

Standard Lithium is listed on the TSX Venture under the trading symbol “SLL”; quoted on the OTCQX under the symbol “STLHF”; and on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange under the symbol “S5L”. Please visit the Company’s website at www.standardlithium.com.

For further information, contact Anthony Alvaro at 604.240.4793.

On behalf of the Board,

Standard Lithium Ltd.

Robert Mintak, CEO & Director

Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

This news release may contain certain “Forward-Looking Statements” within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and applicable Canadian securities laws. When used in this news release, the words “anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “expect”, “target”, “plan”, “forecast”, “may”, “schedule” and other similar words or expressions identify forward-looking statements or information. These forward-looking statements or information may relate to future prices of commodities, accuracy of mineral or resource exploration activity, reserves or resources, regulatory or government requirements or approvals, the reliability of third party information, continued access to mineral properties or infrastructure, fluctuations in the market for lithium and its derivatives, changes in exploration costs and government regulation in Canada and the United States, and other factors or information. Such statements represent the Company’s current views with respect to future events and are necessarily based upon a number of assumptions and estimates that, while considered reasonable by the Company, are inherently subject to significant business, economic, competitive, political and social risks, contingencies and uncertainties. Many factors, both known and unknown, could cause results, performance or achievements to be materially different from the results, performance or achievements that are or may be expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. The Company does not intend, and does not assume any obligation, to update these forward-looking statements or information to reflect changes in assumptions or changes in circumstances or any other events affections such statements and information other than as required by applicable laws, rules and regulations.

Neither the Company, nor TETRA Technologies makes any representations as to the value of lease rights associated with TETRA Technologies Bristol Dry Lake and or Cadiz Dry Lake mineral claims (the “Properties”), the availability of any particular resource or minerals on the Properties, or the merits of any proposed exploration work to be completed on the Properties.  TETRA Technologies expressly disclaims any responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of disclosure made by the Company in respect of the Properties.  Readers are cautioned that a “Qualified Person” (as that term is defined by National Instrument 43-101 – Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects) has not done sufficient work to specify any mineral resource or reserve on the Properties.

Valley Voice: Cadiz Water Project has followed rules, process – The Desert Sun

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Cadiz Inc plans to pump the Mojave Desert aquifer and transport that water to southern California communities.
Jay Calderon/The Desert Sun

Our state’s landmark California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) is one of the most rigorous environmental laws in the nation. Unlike federal environmental regulations, CEQA goes beyond identifying environmental impacts, requiring that they be mitigated to a level of insignificance. By utilizing a process that must consider all opinions, CEQA ensures that certified projects are actually safe for the environment and worthy of moving forward.

That’s why a recent Desert Sun editorial, “California officials must maintain pressure on Cadiz aquifer project” was disappointing. Its call for state officials to target the project didn’t detail the CEQA process we completed and the safeguards and enforcement provisions imposed during the process and upheld by the courts.

The Cadiz Water Project will create a new water supply for 400,000 Californians by conserving groundwater before it is lost to evaporation in the eastern Mojave Desert. The watershed that brings groundwater to the project area is twice the size of the entire Coachella Valley and contains more water underground than Lake Mead, America’s largest reservoir. The project would capture less than one-half of one percent of this groundwater annually before it evaporates, to safely provide a new water supply.

MORE: Feds say no new permit needed for Cadiz project

OUR VOICE: State must maintain pressure on Mojave Desert water project

During Cadiz’s public CEQA process, all comments and studies, including those brought forward by opponents, were evaluated and incorporated into the Project’s Environmental Impact Report. After two public agencies approved the EIR and the Project, the approvals were challenged, but upheld in Superior Court and then sustained by the California Court of Appeal against every claim. No further studies were ordered, or approvals changed. Still, the Desert Sun editorial again raises environmentalists’ claims that the project could “severely compromise” desert ecosystems, even though the CEQA approvals and the Court opinions concluded that the project, as designed and managed, would not harm the desert environment. The editorial also omits that San Bernardino County separately reviewed the Project and will regulate operations to prevent adverse impacts under a court-approved plan.

The Desert Sun editorial also misses the mark on the recent federal certification regarding the project’s use of a railroad right-of-way. It’s true that the government withdrew an evaluation crafted during the Obama administration, but that assessment was already under investigation by Obama’s own Interior inspector general and the pre-Trump Congress, and criticized by lawmakers from both sides of the aisle.

Our proposal to co-locate water infrastructure in a railroad right-of-way is consistent with 100 years of federal practice. It complies with the policy of past administrations, including President Obama, who allowed infrastructure to be installed along railroad tracks without secondary permitting. Such co-location doesn’t avoid environmental review; it avoids environmental impacts to open federal lands — a virtue, not a vice.

California has rightly taken a stand against federal policies and decisions that threaten our environmental laws. But that’s not the case here. Instead, the federal government is supporting local infrastructure permitting and control of resources, which is better for California.  

Sadly, opponents of the Cadiz Project, buttressed by one U.S. senator, have continually distorted the public record and moved the goal posts, dissatisfied by the outcome at every point along the way. But, the truth remains: The Cadiz Project has always followed the law and policy at the local, state and federal level, and we will continue to do so as we deliver a new, environmentally sustainable water supply for Southern California.

Courtney Degener, whose family has lived in the Coachella Valley for more than 25 years, is a vice president at Cadiz Inc. overseeing the company’s external affairs. Email her at cdegener@cadizinc.com. 

Janet Ilene Smith – Harrison News Herald

Janet Ilene Smith, 82, of Cadiz, died Tuesday, Oct.  24, 2017 at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh.  She was born July 13, 1935 in Unionvale, Ohio a daughter of the late George and Leora Kelly Stevens.

She was a retired cook and server from Cadiz High School,  past two-time Worthy Matron of Harrison Chapter #353, Order of the Eastern Star; member and past president of the Cadiz F.O.E. Aerie #2162 Auxiliary; former member of Cadiz Legion Post #34 Auxiliary and Methodist by faith.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband Marshal Denver Smith in 2008 after 58 years of marriage and a brother, Tippie Stevens.

Surviving are her children, Bonnie Beetham and Denver Dale (Ann) Smith, all of Cadiz, and Steven Lee (Lori Skinner) Smith of Johnstown; two grandchildren, Meghan (Thomas) Owings of Medina and Daryck (Stephanie) Beetham of Greensboro, NC; great grandchildren: Leora, Samuel, Marshal, Evan, Ruby, Daryck Marshal and Elyssa; a sister, Jean Reppart of Cadiz and a brother, Arnold (Juanita) Stevens of Marion, Ohio.

A private service will be held at the convenience of the family with Rev. Timothy Monteith. Arrangements by Clark-Kirkland Funeral Home, Cadiz, Ohio. Interment will be at Cadiz Union Cemetery.

The memorial guestbook may be signed at www.clark-kirkland.com.

Richard Paul McAfee – Harrison News Herald

Richard Paul McAfee, 82, of Cadiz, died Monday, Oct. 23, 2017 at Wheeling Hospital.  He was born June 15, 1935 in Adena, Ohio, a son of the late William Paul McAfee and the late Mildred McMannis McAfee Stairs.

Mr. McAfee was a retired employee of Vendors Exchange in Cleveland, Ohio. He volunteered at HARCATUS Community Action and at Sally Buffalo Park. He was an avid fisherman and was a member of St. James AME Church in Cadiz.

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Diane Weiss McAfee in 2012; two brothers, Robert and Donald McAfee and a sister, Freida Hinegardner.

Surviving are three daughters, Tabitha (Dale) West and Mildred (Bobby) Reed, all of Cadiz and Richelle (Timothy) Tomer of Flushing; three sons, Anthony McAfee of Zoar, Curt (Teresa) McAfee of Lisbon, and Richard Lowe of NC; thirteen grandchildren; seven great grandchildren and two more on the way; and a sister, Margaret Kellermier of Cadiz.

Friends may call Saturday from 11 a.m. until time of service at 1 p.m. at Clark-Kirkland Funeral Home, Cadiz.  Rev. William Lewis and Pastor Mark Smith will officiate.

Online condolences may be made at www.clark-kirkland.com.