Tsunami Cadiz and Huelva: Tidal wave warning for Spain and … – Daily Star


“The question is not whether there will be another tsunami, but when will it happen.”


Begona Perez, Head of the Division of Oceanography of Spanish Ports

The fallout on Spain’s Andalusian Atlantic coasts would be catastrophic, if a wave with the force of the Great Lisbon disaster were to strike.

Popular Spanish holiday hotspots such as Almería, Cádiz, Córdoba, Granada, Huelva, Jaén, Málaga and Seville would be in the firing line.

Maria Belon, who survived the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami in the Indian Ocean, said the wave is “already on its way”.

But worryingly, Ms Belon, whose survival story inspired the film The Impossible, added: “We don’t know when it will get here.”

Now experts are urging the Spanish government to invest in better warning systems to save thousands of lives.

Mega TSUNAMI that could kill 10000 ‘ON ITS WAY to hols Brits in Spain and Portugal’ – Daily Star


“The question is not whether there will be another tsunami, but when will it happen.”


Begona Perez, Head of the Division of Oceanography of Spanish Ports

The fallout on Spain’s Andalusian Atlantic coasts would be catastrophic, if a wave with the force of the Great Lisbon disaster were to strike.

Popular Spanish holiday hotspots such as Almería, Cádiz, Córdoba, Granada, Huelva, Jaén, Málaga and Seville would be in the firing line.

Maria Belon, who survived the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami in the Indian Ocean, said the wave is “already on its way”.

But worryingly, Ms Belon, whose survival story inspired the film The Impossible, added: “We don’t know when it will get here.”

Now experts are urging the Spanish government to invest in better warning systems to save thousands of lives.

Village of Cadiz taking applications for water treatment plant superintendent – New Philadelphia Times Reporter


The village of Cadiz will take applications for water treatment plant superintendent through noon April 10.

The superintendent will report to the village administrator and is responsible for planning, managing and overseeing the activities and operations of the plant and distribution system, including researching and analyzing plant treatment issues, performing laboratory testing for water quality, preparation of Environmental Protection Agency reports, analysis and evaluation of laboratory changes deemed necessary, reviewing and evaluating plant mechanical operations, planning and oversight of bacteriological sampling programs, the inspection, maintenance and repair of plant equipment, developing and overseeing mechanical maintenance, monitoring staff professional development and training, attending professional meeting and preparing a budget with the village administrator.

Applicants must have a state of Ohio Class 3 water plant operator license and a valid Ohio driver’s license.

For applications: villageadmin@villageofcadiz.com; the Cadiz Municipal Building, 128 Court St.

SUBMITTED BY VILLAGE OF CADIZ

 

Thoroughly reviewed Cadiz project to provide water, jobs: Guest … – San Bernardino County Sun




U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein recently authored a column decrying the Cadiz Water Project as bad for the environment, in violation of federal regulations and a threat to a national monument.

That’s not the Cadiz Water Project I know, nor the project that’s been publicly reviewed, approved and upheld in our state’s courts. Unfortunately, Sen. Feinstein, D-Calif., seems to have overlooked key facts about a project that will help California, not hurt it.

Here are the facts: When fully built, the Cadiz project will provide a new, reliable water supply for 400,000 citizens in Southern California, create and support 5,900 jobs and generate billions of dollars of economic activity. In addition, the project will make available new underground water storage to accommodate extremely wet winters, like the one we’ve had this year.


The senator’s assertion that Cadiz does not uphold California’s proud environmental tradition is flatly wrong. Over the past decade, the project has undergone California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review, the most stringent standard in the nation. That lengthy analysis concluded the project would not cause significant environmental impacts on the desert environment or tribal lands. This analysis was challenged in court by opponents, but withstood every legal challenge.

When discussing how much water will enter the Cadiz aquifer annually, or its recharge rate, Sen. Feinstein relies on old data from 2000 without acknowledging the significant site-specific data collected by scientists since that time, nor the leaps and bounds made in technological advancements. In 2000, the iPhone and Facebook didn’t exist. Nor did site-specific measurements of the Cadiz Dry Lake’s evaporation or a newer, better U.S. Geological Survey model. These tools have allowed hydrologists to more accurately detail the magnitude of the water supply and groundwater flow system, giving regulators the information needed to limit the project and how it operates.


The project’s groundwater management plan guarantees project operations will be annually constrained to less than 1 percent of what is in the watershed, and to a specific “floor.” The County of San Bernardino, which has been recognized as a champion of local resource management by environmental organizations, has authority to halt operations.

Sen. Feinstein also contends that the Cadiz Water Project does not conform to federal regulations and therefore should be subject to National Environmental Protection Act review — but there is no nexus for federal review. The 43-mile Cadiz pipeline will be built underground, alongside an existing railroad route, to avoid federal land or pristine open space. Co-location of utilities alongside railroad tracks is good public policy that’s been in place for decades. Use of an existing right-of-way is precisely what federal regulations should encourage, not abuse to further delay needed infrastructure. No environmental review is more rigorous than the one already completed by the Cadiz Water Project; it should be embraced, not ignored.


President Obama’s recent designation of the Mojave Trails National Monument did not create a new federal permitting nexus for the project. The Cadiz Water Project is not in the monument, which by law can only include federal lands and cannot impact valid existing rights, including Cadiz’s property rights. This continued misrepresentation only serves to chill the necessary dialogue about how to manage the federal monument lands for environmental and public uses among all parties in the desert, including Cadiz.



Moreover, due to legislation authored by Sen. Feinstein hiding deep within the Interior Appropriations bill, the federal government is actually prohibited from completing a federal review for the Cadiz Project. How can one argue that the project requires federal review while continuing to block the government from doing so? This insinuates that support for federal review is about politics, not the environment. Perhaps this is why the treatment of Cadiz is under investigation by the U.S. House Oversight Committee. Or why a bipartisan group of House members have asked for Interior to remove the bureaucratic red tape that’s stymieing the project.


The accusations against the project levied by Sen. Feinstein are serious, but completely unsupported. The fact remains that over eight years, the project has been studied, publicly reviewed, approved and upheld under our state’s rigorous environmental laws. It will not and cannot “gravely” impact the desert. Rather, it will provide needed water, jobs and economic stimulus for Southern California without harm to the environment, or without one dollar of taxpayer money. Cadiz is precisely the kind of water project California needs right now. It is a model public-private partnership. Let’s get to work.


Winston Hickox is a member of the Cadiz Inc. board of directors. Previously, he was secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) for Gov. Gray Davis from 1999–2003; special assistant for environmental affairs to Gov. Jerry Brown (1975-1983) and an alternate for the California Coastal Commission (1997-1999). He has served on the boards of Audubon California, Sustainable Conservation, and California League of Conservation Voters.


Thoroughly reviewed Cadiz project to provide water, jobs: Guest commentary – San Bernardino County Sun




U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein recently authored a column decrying the Cadiz Water Project as bad for the environment, in violation of federal regulations and a threat to a national monument.

That’s not the Cadiz Water Project I know, nor the project that’s been publicly reviewed, approved and upheld in our state’s courts. Unfortunately, Sen. Feinstein, D-Calif., seems to have overlooked key facts about a project that will help California, not hurt it.

Here are the facts: When fully built, the Cadiz project will provide a new, reliable water supply for 400,000 citizens in Southern California, create and support 5,900 jobs and generate billions of dollars of economic activity. In addition, the project will make available new underground water storage to accommodate extremely wet winters, like the one we’ve had this year.


The senator’s assertion that Cadiz does not uphold California’s proud environmental tradition is flatly wrong. Over the past decade, the project has undergone California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review, the most stringent standard in the nation. That lengthy analysis concluded the project would not cause significant environmental impacts on the desert environment or tribal lands. This analysis was challenged in court by opponents, but withstood every legal challenge.

When discussing how much water will enter the Cadiz aquifer annually, or its recharge rate, Sen. Feinstein relies on old data from 2000 without acknowledging the significant site-specific data collected by scientists since that time, nor the leaps and bounds made in technological advancements. In 2000, the iPhone and Facebook didn’t exist. Nor did site-specific measurements of the Cadiz Dry Lake’s evaporation or a newer, better U.S. Geological Survey model. These tools have allowed hydrologists to more accurately detail the magnitude of the water supply and groundwater flow system, giving regulators the information needed to limit the project and how it operates.


The project’s groundwater management plan guarantees project operations will be annually constrained to less than 1 percent of what is in the watershed, and to a specific “floor.” The County of San Bernardino, which has been recognized as a champion of local resource management by environmental organizations, has authority to halt operations.

Sen. Feinstein also contends that the Cadiz Water Project does not conform to federal regulations and therefore should be subject to National Environmental Protection Act review — but there is no nexus for federal review. The 43-mile Cadiz pipeline will be built underground, alongside an existing railroad route, to avoid federal land or pristine open space. Co-location of utilities alongside railroad tracks is good public policy that’s been in place for decades. Use of an existing right-of-way is precisely what federal regulations should encourage, not abuse to further delay needed infrastructure. No environmental review is more rigorous than the one already completed by the Cadiz Water Project; it should be embraced, not ignored.


President Obama’s recent designation of the Mojave Trails National Monument did not create a new federal permitting nexus for the project. The Cadiz Water Project is not in the monument, which by law can only include federal lands and cannot impact valid existing rights, including Cadiz’s property rights. This continued misrepresentation only serves to chill the necessary dialogue about how to manage the federal monument lands for environmental and public uses among all parties in the desert, including Cadiz.



Moreover, due to legislation authored by Sen. Feinstein hiding deep within the Interior Appropriations bill, the federal government is actually prohibited from completing a federal review for the Cadiz Project. How can one argue that the project requires federal review while continuing to block the government from doing so? This insinuates that support for federal review is about politics, not the environment. Perhaps this is why the treatment of Cadiz is under investigation by the U.S. House Oversight Committee. Or why a bipartisan group of House members have asked for Interior to remove the bureaucratic red tape that’s stymieing the project.


The accusations against the project levied by Sen. Feinstein are serious, but completely unsupported. The fact remains that over eight years, the project has been studied, publicly reviewed, approved and upheld under our state’s rigorous environmental laws. It will not and cannot “gravely” impact the desert. Rather, it will provide needed water, jobs and economic stimulus for Southern California without harm to the environment, or without one dollar of taxpayer money. Cadiz is precisely the kind of water project California needs right now. It is a model public-private partnership. Let’s get to work.


Winston Hickox is a member of the Cadiz Inc. board of directors. Previously, he was secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) for Gov. Gray Davis from 1999–2003; special assistant for environmental affairs to Gov. Jerry Brown (1975-1983) and an alternate for the California Coastal Commission (1997-1999). He has served on the boards of Audubon California, Sustainable Conservation, and California League of Conservation Voters.


Thoroughly reviewed Cadiz project to provide water, jobs: Guest commentary – Redlands Daily Facts




U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein recently authored a column decrying the Cadiz Water Project as bad for the environment, in violation of federal regulations and a threat to a national monument.

That’s not the Cadiz Water Project I know, nor the project that’s been publicly reviewed, approved and upheld in our state’s courts. Unfortunately, Sen. Feinstein, D-Calif., seems to have overlooked key facts about a project that will help California, not hurt it.

Here are the facts: When fully built, the Cadiz project will provide a new, reliable water supply for 400,000 citizens in Southern California, create and support 5,900 jobs and generate billions of dollars of economic activity. In addition, the project will make available new underground water storage to accommodate extremely wet winters, like the one we’ve had this year.


The senator’s assertion that Cadiz does not uphold California’s proud environmental tradition is flatly wrong. Over the past decade, the project has undergone California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) review, the most stringent standard in the nation. That lengthy analysis concluded the project would not cause significant environmental impacts on the desert environment or tribal lands. This analysis was challenged in court by opponents, but withstood every legal challenge.

When discussing how much water will enter the Cadiz aquifer annually, or its recharge rate, Sen. Feinstein relies on old data from 2000 without acknowledging the significant site-specific data collected by scientists since that time, nor the leaps and bounds made in technological advancements. In 2000, the iPhone and Facebook didn’t exist. Nor did site-specific measurements of the Cadiz Dry Lake’s evaporation or a newer, better U.S. Geological Survey model. These tools have allowed hydrologists to more accurately detail the magnitude of the water supply and groundwater flow system, giving regulators the information needed to limit the project and how it operates.


The project’s groundwater management plan guarantees project operations will be annually constrained to less than 1 percent of what is in the watershed, and to a specific “floor.” The County of San Bernardino, which has been recognized as a champion of local resource management by environmental organizations, has authority to halt operations.

Sen. Feinstein also contends that the Cadiz Water Project does not conform to federal regulations and therefore should be subject to National Environmental Protection Act review — but there is no nexus for federal review. The 43-mile Cadiz pipeline will be built underground, alongside an existing railroad route, to avoid federal land or pristine open space. Co-location of utilities alongside railroad tracks is good public policy that’s been in place for decades. Use of an existing right-of-way is precisely what federal regulations should encourage, not abuse to further delay needed infrastructure. No environmental review is more rigorous than the one already completed by the Cadiz Water Project; it should be embraced, not ignored.


President Obama’s recent designation of the Mojave Trails National Monument did not create a new federal permitting nexus for the project. The Cadiz Water Project is not in the monument, which by law can only include federal lands and cannot impact valid existing rights, including Cadiz’s property rights. This continued misrepresentation only serves to chill the necessary dialogue about how to manage the federal monument lands for environmental and public uses among all parties in the desert, including Cadiz.



Moreover, due to legislation authored by Sen. Feinstein hiding deep within the Interior Appropriations bill, the federal government is actually prohibited from completing a federal review for the Cadiz Project. How can one argue that the project requires federal review while continuing to block the government from doing so? This insinuates that support for federal review is about politics, not the environment. Perhaps this is why the treatment of Cadiz is under investigation by the U.S. House Oversight Committee. Or why a bipartisan group of House members have asked for Interior to remove the bureaucratic red tape that’s stymieing the project.


The accusations against the project levied by Sen. Feinstein are serious, but completely unsupported. The fact remains that over eight years, the project has been studied, publicly reviewed, approved and upheld under our state’s rigorous environmental laws. It will not and cannot “gravely” impact the desert. Rather, it will provide needed water, jobs and economic stimulus for Southern California without harm to the environment, or without one dollar of taxpayer money. Cadiz is precisely the kind of water project California needs right now. It is a model public-private partnership. Let’s get to work.


Winston Hickox is a member of the Cadiz Inc. board of directors. Previously, he was secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) for Gov. Gray Davis from 1999–2003; special assistant for environmental affairs to Gov. Jerry Brown (1975-1983) and an alternate for the California Coastal Commission (1997-1999). He has served on the boards of Audubon California, Sustainable Conservation, and California League of Conservation Voters.


Many honored at annual Cadiz event | News, Sports, Jobs – Weirton … – The Daily Times

All groups and individuals named are worthy of the awards, and I am quite proud of the Tony Pietrangelo’s Memorial Beautification Award as he came from Smithfield and then chose Cadiz as the place for his family and has done much to improve the appearance of the village.

Another award dear to my heart is the Wellspring Pregnancy organization award. I have known Tammy Hosenfeld, its founder, since her youth. It started through a dream telling her that there was a need to help single mothers, those with a small income and a large need for supplies for a new baby or a young child. The organization is located at 130 N. Main St., Cadiz, and went on to expand into West Virginia.

Shelly Coffelt and Christine Popkey, board members, handled the awards for the nonprofit group that is staffed by caring volunteers and supported by tax-deductible contributions.

They provide free confidential pregnancy tests, a resource center for educational materials, a program where moms can earn big items such as cribs and car seats by completing personalized lessons and a parenting and life skills program. And guess what? They also have practical fatherhood lessons on being role models and caring for the baby.

Mayor Ken Zitko gave the welcome. I have known him since my days at the Cadiz Bureau on Market Street, where I grew to know and love many of the people who helped me learn the ins and outs of the county. Adrian Pincola has been master of ceremonies for many years and never disappoints on jokes and picking on someone important in the audience. This time, though, he was more subdued.

Sue Adams, who I met in my Cadiz days and has helped me find news so many times, presented the Cadiz Woman’s Civic Club Community Service award.

Jay Peterson, whose mother, Valjean, was from Smithfield, (notice how I like to get Smithfield in here?) was another outstanding athlete with the Cadiz Cardinals in many sports and excelled in college. I think it is wonderful that he came back to Cadiz to serve as a specialty coach for the Cardinals team where he set so many records.

Along with doing this, Ken is on the hospital board, worked with the cleanup and beautification of the Cadiz corner in removing buildings, is a Lions member and wears many other hats. His wife, Adele, a truly energetic and bubbly lady, has worked with the Harrison County Extension as master gardener and many projects in the village.

The Pietrangelo Memorial Beautification Award, with David Ossman accepting, also goes to John Migliore and the Christopher Spring Group, who have kept the natural spring that has been running for years. Many still stop for the clean, cool water.

Charles Yoho received the Sally Buffalo Park board award of excellence. He was unable to attend, but Tom Crawshaw accepted the award for him.

Nip and Tammy Mattern accepted the Mattern Tire business of the year award for expanding their business with the coming of the gas and oil industry. It now has 13 employees.

Jenny Gibson was voted by the community as the Citizens Choice Award recipient for her work in the backpack program for pupils in the county schools. They get to discreetly take home a backpack of foods to keep them from hunger over the weekend. This has grown to about 274 students in the school system.

Ron Stein was the Cadiz Lions citizen of the year. It is the first time that the award was not a secret until the presentation and the first for someone not a member of the Lions. He is a distinguished officer and member of the Cadiz Eagles.

≤≤≤≤≤

Think about where your food comes from this week. Milk comes from cows, not the store, and hamburger and sausage come from hogs and steers. The Jefferson County Farm Bureau is promoting this through AG Week place mats for restaurants and the presentation of gifts to a baby first born on this week.

Ohio 4-H Week just concluded, and 28 clubs decorated business windows to tell the meaning and rewards of being a member. It really was an informational and fun job to be the judge, but it was really hard and agonizing to chose winners since everyone put so much effort into each one of the windows. You are all winners in my estimation. Good job.

<!–

–>


Many honored at annual Cadiz event | News, Sports, Jobs – The … – The Steubenville Herald-Star

All groups and individuals named are worthy of the awards, and I am quite proud of the Tony Pietrangelo’s Memorial Beautification Award as he came from Smithfield and then chose Cadiz as the place for his family and has done much to improve the appearance of the village.

Another award dear to my heart is the Wellspring Pregnancy organization award. I have known Tammy Hosenfeld, its founder, since her youth. It started through a dream telling her that there was a need to help single mothers, those with a small income and a large need for supplies for a new baby or a young child. The organization is located at 130 N. Main St., Cadiz, and went on to expand into West Virginia.

Shelly Coffelt and Christine Popkey, board members, handled the awards for the nonprofit group that is staffed by caring volunteers and supported by tax-deductible contributions.

They provide free confidential pregnancy tests, a resource center for educational materials, a program where moms can earn big items such as cribs and car seats by completing personalized lessons and a parenting and life skills program. And guess what? They also have practical fatherhood lessons on being role models and caring for the baby.

Mayor Ken Zitko gave the welcome. I have known him since my days at the Cadiz Bureau on Market Street, where I grew to know and love many of the people who helped me learn the ins and outs of the county. Adrian Pincola has been master of ceremonies for many years and never disappoints on jokes and picking on someone important in the audience. This time, though, he was more subdued.

Sue Adams, who I met in my Cadiz days and has helped me find news so many times, presented the Cadiz Woman’s Civic Club Community Service award.

Jay Peterson, whose mother, Valjean, was from Smithfield, (notice how I like to get Smithfield in here?) was another outstanding athlete with the Cadiz Cardinals in many sports and excelled in college. I think it is wonderful that he came back to Cadiz to serve as a specialty coach for the Cardinals team where he set so many records.

Along with doing this, Ken is on the hospital board, worked with the cleanup and beautification of the Cadiz corner in removing buildings, is a Lions member and wears many other hats. His wife, Adele, a truly energetic and bubbly lady, has worked with the Harrison County Extension as master gardener and many projects in the village.

The Pietrangelo Memorial Beautification Award, with David Ossman accepting, also goes to John Migliore and the Christopher Spring Group, who have kept the natural spring that has been running for years. Many still stop for the clean, cool water.

Charles Yoho received the Sally Buffalo Park board award of excellence. He was unable to attend, but Tom Crawshaw accepted the award for him.

Nip and Tammy Mattern accepted the Mattern Tire business of the year award for expanding their business with the coming of the gas and oil industry. It now has 13 employees.

Jenny Gibson was voted by the community as the Citizens Choice Award recipient for her work in the backpack program for pupils in the county schools. They get to discreetly take home a backpack of foods to keep them from hunger over the weekend. This has grown to about 274 students in the school system.

Ron Stein was the Cadiz Lions citizen of the year. It is the first time that the award was not a secret until the presentation and the first for someone not a member of the Lions. He is a distinguished officer and member of the Cadiz Eagles.

≤≤≤≤≤

Think about where your food comes from this week. Milk comes from cows, not the store, and hamburger and sausage come from hogs and steers. The Jefferson County Farm Bureau is promoting this through AG Week place mats for restaurants and the presentation of gifts to a baby first born on this week.

Ohio 4-H Week just concluded, and 28 clubs decorated business windows to tell the meaning and rewards of being a member. It really was an informational and fun job to be the judge, but it was really hard and agonizing to chose winners since everyone put so much effort into each one of the windows. You are all winners in my estimation. Good job.

<!–

–>


Many honored at annual Cadiz event – The Steubenville Herald-Star

All groups and individuals named are worthy of the awards, and I am quite proud of the Tony Pietrangelo’s Memorial Beautification Award as he came from Smithfield and then chose Cadiz as the place for his family and has done much to improve the appearance of the village.

Another award dear to my heart is the Wellspring Pregnancy organization award. I have known Tammy Hosenfeld, its founder, since her youth. It started through a dream telling her that there was a need to help single mothers, those with a small income and a large need for supplies for a new baby or a young child. The organization is located at 130 N. Main St., Cadiz, and went on to expand into West Virginia.

Shelly Coffelt and Christine Popkey, board members, handled the awards for the nonprofit group that is staffed by caring volunteers and supported by tax-deductible contributions.

They provide free confidential pregnancy tests, a resource center for educational materials, a program where moms can earn big items such as cribs and car seats by completing personalized lessons and a parenting and life skills program. And guess what? They also have practical fatherhood lessons on being role models and caring for the baby.

Mayor Ken Zitko gave the welcome. I have known him since my days at the Cadiz Bureau on Market Street, where I grew to know and love many of the people who helped me learn the ins and outs of the county. Adrian Pincola has been master of ceremonies for many years and never disappoints on jokes and picking on someone important in the audience. This time, though, he was more subdued.

Sue Adams, who I met in my Cadiz days and has helped me find news so many times, presented the Cadiz Woman’s Civic Club Community Service award.

Jay Peterson, whose mother, Valjean, was from Smithfield, (notice how I like to get Smithfield in here?) was another outstanding athlete with the Cadiz Cardinals in many sports and excelled in college. I think it is wonderful that he came back to Cadiz to serve as a specialty coach for the Cardinals team where he set so many records.

Along with doing this, Ken is on the hospital board, worked with the cleanup and beautification of the Cadiz corner in removing buildings, is a Lions member and wears many other hats. His wife, Adele, a truly energetic and bubbly lady, has worked with the Harrison County Extension as master gardener and many projects in the village.

The Pietrangelo Memorial Beautification Award, with David Ossman accepting, also goes to John Migliore and the Christopher Spring Group, who have kept the natural spring that has been running for years. Many still stop for the clean, cool water.

Charles Yoho received the Sally Buffalo Park board award of excellence. He was unable to attend, but Tom Crawshaw accepted the award for him.

Nip and Tammy Mattern accepted the Mattern Tire business of the year award for expanding their business with the coming of the gas and oil industry. It now has 13 employees.

Jenny Gibson was voted by the community as the Citizens Choice Award recipient for her work in the backpack program for pupils in the county schools. They get to discreetly take home a backpack of foods to keep them from hunger over the weekend. This has grown to about 274 students in the school system.

Ron Stein was the Cadiz Lions citizen of the year. It is the first time that the award was not a secret until the presentation and the first for someone not a member of the Lions. He is a distinguished officer and member of the Cadiz Eagles.

≤≤≤≤≤

Think about where your food comes from this week. Milk comes from cows, not the store, and hamburger and sausage come from hogs and steers. The Jefferson County Farm Bureau is promoting this through AG Week place mats for restaurants and the presentation of gifts to a baby first born on this week.

Ohio 4-H Week just concluded, and 28 clubs decorated business windows to tell the meaning and rewards of being a member. It really was an informational and fun job to be the judge, but it was really hard and agonizing to chose winners since everyone put so much effort into each one of the windows. You are all winners in my estimation. Good job.

<!–

–>


Students stand up against smoking – Martins Ferry Times Leader


T-L Photo/DYLAN McKENZIE 
Harrison Central Jr./Sr. High School seventh-grade student members of Students Against Destructive Decisions pose for a picture in front of a display of statistics on cigarette chemicals. SADD members participated in several activities Wednesday to draw attention to the risks of tobacco use. Shown in the back row from left are Alexis Dulkoski, Paige Weaver, Dezirae Garcia, Rayla Jones, Savhana Lapanja and Siera Graham; front row, Sophia Brammer, Jessica Nelson, Lela Sproull, Jordan Stewart and Kylee Sparks.

T-L Photo/DYLAN McKENZIE
Harrison Central Jr./Sr. High School seventh-grade student members of Students Against Destructive Decisions pose for a picture in front of a display of statistics on cigarette chemicals. SADD members participated in several activities Wednesday to draw attention to the risks of tobacco use. Shown in the back row from left are Alexis Dulkoski, Paige Weaver, Dezirae Garcia, Rayla Jones, Savhana Lapanja and Siera Graham; front row, Sophia Brammer, Jessica Nelson, Lela Sproull, Jordan Stewart and Kylee Sparks.

<!–

–>

CADIZ — Students in Cadiz spoke out against smoking on Tuesday, taking part in a nationwide event to help students avoid the risks of tobacco use.

March 15 was Kick Butts Day, which is “a national day of activism that empowers youth to stand out, speak up and seize control against Big Tobacco,” according to the event’s website. The events have been going on since 1996, focusing on helping children resist peer pressure to smoke and helping them pledge to stay tobacco free. This year’s Kick Butts focus was on the tobacco industry advertising aimed toward younger people. This is done with sweet flavored e-cigarettes and cigars, which are more widely smoked among high school age students; critics of the industry claim that the candy and fruit flavored products result in more high schoolers picking up tobacco products at an early age. According to the website, more than 1,000 schools participated in the Kick Butts day, including students from Harrison Hills Central Jr./Sr. High School in Cadiz.

Students with the school’s Students Against Destructive Decisions and Students Taking A New Direction groups participated in several events to raise awareness about tobacco abuse Wednesday, in unison with the nationwide Kick Butt events. Participating students danced in a flash mod in the school cafeteria. They then braved the cold in a march to the Harrison County Courthouse, carrying signs to raise awareness. When they returned to the school, members of the group took signatures from students pledging to stay smoke free. After signing, students could put a stamp on a large poster along with their name, proudly showing their dedication to staying smoke free.

“It was very fun,” said seventh-grader Siera Graham. “I think the message got out.”

Kristen Foraker, prevention specialist for the school, said this is the third year the school has participated in the Kick Butts event, and organizers plan to continue in the future. Foraker said the events and the SADD and STAND groups have had positive effects on the students at the school, and that she was quite happy with this year’s program.

“This group did really well,” Foraker said. “They were all super excited for the activities we did. They came up with some of the ideas and put their own spin on them.”

Seventh-grader Lela Sproull agreed that the day went well and said she was happy to be a part of the school SADD group and looked forward to participating in future events.

“I like it,” she said. “You get to participate in different activities and stand up against things that are wrong. You get to really participate in SADD.”

For more information on Kick Butts Day, visit www.kickbuttsday.org.

<!–

–>